Puerto Rico: Its Conditions and Posibilities

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Harper & Bros., 1899 - Agriculture - 293 pages
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Page 166 - ... citizen of the United States, it can be done, for the reason that he is docile, obliging, appreciative of favors, and, best of all, possesses an inbred courtesy and politeness, and an equability of temperament, which permit him to readily absorb new ideas.
Page 159 - So they live, without expense and with little tenderness bestowed on them in the shape of material comforts, though the mother's kiss is often given, and the father pats the little head. They soon toddle, at the command of the mother, to do small errands, to help weed the garden, to bring in a handful of wood for the fire, to dig the tubers for a meager meal, and lastly to hold up their tiny hands and, with pleading eyes, gain a copper from the passer-by on the roadside. They are a good investment...
Page xii - Spaniard went back to his own country — though only for a time, perhaps — and his wife and children must weep and go hungry until his return. As if in answer to the shrill blasts of Spanish bugles, came the deeper notes of our own, echoing back from without the city limits, and soon the steady, sturdy tramp of our own stalwart men resounded between the low walls of the city streets. We were going to cheer our country's...
Page xii - ... evacuation, strangers slept three and four together in the tiny, dark rooms, whose only source of light was the stained-glass doors opening into a central rotunda, suffering all night long from an infestation of humming, insatiable mosquitoes. In the harbor lay a Spanish transport, ready to...
Page 159 - ... soon toddle, at the command of the mother, to do small errands, to help weed the garden, to bring in a handful of wood for the fire, to dig the tubers for a meager meal, and lastly to hold up their tiny hands and, with pleading eyes, gain a copper from the passer-by on the roadside. They are a good investment in the family; the majority of them die at an early age, and it costs but a few strained hours to the mother's heart, a bit of cloth for a shroud, and the energy needed to carry the tiny...
Page 182 - The principal house portion of the town consists of wellconstructed — so far as the walls go — double-storied buildings, with now and then one rising to three floors. In the more squalid portions of the city (one can walk all over the town in an hour), the houses are but a story high, and in a single room an entire family — and more — eke out an existence in the semi-darkness of the onewindowed, illy-ventilated apartment.
Page 181 - San Juan San Juan, as the seat of the island government, has always been the leading city in population, and also as regards the congested condition of its populace. It boasts — naturally, as the past home of the Spanish Governor-General — the...
Page 181 - ... for general local improvements than in any other city. It has undoubtedly the best harbor on the island, in that it is completely landlocked, though at present it is sadly in need of dredging so that ships may have sufficient depth of water and room to maneuver in the basin.
Page 159 - Domestic economy is a fitting term, since it costs nothing to supply the air of day for the lungs of these little waifs, and it costs nothing for their clothes, for they run about in the sunshine and the rain just as God made them, and sleep in odd corners without cover, for the first half-dozen years of their baby lives, while, when older, a single discarded, tattered garment adds to their natural grace the shield of decency. So they live, without expense, and with little tenderness bestowed upon...
Page 159 - ... them in the shape of material comforts, though the mother's kiss is often given, and the father pats the little head. They soon toddle, at the command of the mother, to do small errands, to help weed the garden, to bring in a handful of wood for the fire, to dig the tubers for a meager meal, and lastly to hold up their tiny hands and, with pleading eyes, gain a copper from the passer-by on the roadside. They are a good investment in the family; the majority of them die at an early age, and it...

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