Puhpohwee for the People: A Narrative Account of Some Use of Fungi Among the Ahnishinaubeg

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Botanical Museum of Harvard University, 1978 - Algonquian Indians - 44 pages
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"Keewaydinoquay is an Ahnishinaabe herbalist & shaman who, in her childhood, was apprenticed to the famous Ahnishinaabe herbalist, Nodjimahkwe, thus falling heir to the traditional knowledge of the plant world among her people. The native peoples of America actually believe that there is an herb to meet every possible need. The word PUH-POH-WEE is an old Algonkian term that means "to swell up in stature suddenly & silently from an unseen source of power." It is particularly suitable when referring to fungi. The Ahnishinaabeg can find a potential PUH-POH-WEE in their ancient cultural heritage. This is a book about the harmony of tribal life in which Keewaydinoquay weaves the medicinal uses of fungi with tales from her own life. Keewaydinoquay is well-known in medicinal circles & tribal organizations in the Lake Michigan & Lake Superior area, also having connections with institutions interested in the anthropology & history of that area."--Google Books.

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Contents

FUNGI AS FOOD
6
5
29
BIBLIOGRAPHY
44

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