Putnam's Magazine, Volume 1

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G.P. Putnam & Son, 1868
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Page 575 - This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles.
Page 247 - Strike — till the last armed foe expires; Strike — for your altars and your fires; Strike — for the green graves of your sires, God — and your native land!
Page 365 - But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you.
Page 120 - ... as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit; or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect; or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon; or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention; or a shop for profit or sale; and not a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 573 - PETER PIPER picked a peck of pickled peppers; A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked; If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers, Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?
Page 244 - Loch Veol's heights, And by Loch Lomond's braes ! And, far and near, through vale and hill, Are faces that attest the same ; The proud heart flashing through the eyes, At sound of ROB ROY'S name.
Page 161 - Hence the vanity of translation ; it were as wise to cast a violet into a crucible that you might discover the formal principle of its colour and odour, as seek to transfuse from one language into another the creations of a poet.
Page 352 - Postmaster-General said in the House of Lords, " Of all the wild and visionary schemes which I have ever heard of, it is the most extravagant.
Page 373 - Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice.
Page 630 - While the observance of that good faith, which is the basis of public credit, is recommended by the strongest inducements of political expediency, it is enforced by considerations of still greater authority. There are arguments for it which rest on the immutable 154 Hamilton's First Report on Public Credit, 179o principles of moral obligation.

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