Putting Meat on the American Table: Taste, Technology, Transformation

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JHU Press, 2006 - History - 170 pages
How did meat become such a popular food among Americans? And why did the popularity of some types of meat increase or decrease? Putting Meat on the American Table explains how America became a meat-eating nation - from the colonial period to the present. It examines the relationships between consumer preference and meat processing - looking closely at the production of beef, pork, chicken, and hot dogs. Roger Horowitz argues that a series of new technologies have transformed American meat - sometimes for the worse, sometimes for the better. He draws on detailed consumption surveys that shed new light on America's eating preferences - especially differences associated with income, rural versus urban areas, and race and ethnicity. Engagingly written, richly illustrated, and abundant with first-hand accounts and quotes from period sources, Putting Meat on the American Table will captivate general readers and interest all students of the history of food, technology, business, and American culture.
 

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Contents

A MeatEating Nation
1
Beef
18
Pork
43
Hot Dogs
75
Chicken
103
Convenient Meat
129
Persistent Nature
153
Notes
155
Index
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