Q E D

Front Cover
Penguin, 1990 - Electrons - 158 pages
12 Reviews
Quantum electrodynamics - or QED, for short - is the revolutionary theory that explains how light and electrons interact. Thanks to richard Feynman and his colleagues, who won the Nobel Prize for their ground-breaking work in this area, it is also one of the rare parts of physics that is known for sure, a theory that has stood the text of time. Based on a series of lectures delivered to the general public at the University of California, Feynman here wittily explains the theory of quantum electrodynamics, the central aspect of much of modern physics.

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User Review  - aquaorbis - LibraryThing

You could call me a science groupie. I put on Cosmos while I clean the house, snatch up Michio Kaku's books like they won't be there tomorrow, know all the words to every Symphony of Science song ever ... Read full review

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User Review  - dcunning11235 - LibraryThing

Another great Feynman book. Every time I read something by him, I get re-excited about physics. Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Richard P. Feynman (1918-1988) was one of this century's most brilliant theoretical physicists and original thinkers. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1965 for his work on QED. Books by Feynman in Penguin include The Character of Physical Law (1992, 36,000 copies), Six Easy Pieces (1998, 27,000 copies, and Six Not-So-Easy Pices (1999, 10,000 copies).

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