Qualitative Communication Research Methods

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SAGE Publications, Oct 8, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 377 pages
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This book is the only guide dedicated to qualitative research methods in communication. It introduces readers to every step of the qualitative research process, from developing research topics and questions, through writing a final report. In addition to covering the theories and methods currently used in qualitative communication research, the authors also discuss important trends influencing the future of that research.

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About the author (2010)

Thomas R. Lindlof is a Professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the University of Kentucky. He received his B.A. from the University of Florida, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to joining the University of Kentucky faculty, he served on the faculty at the Pennsylvania State University. His research and graduate teaching are focused on the cultural analysis of mediated communication, media audience theory and research, social uses of communication technology, and interpretive research methods. His research has appeared in numerous scholarly outlets, including Communication Research, the Journal of Communication, the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Journalism Quarterly, Journalism Studies, the Journal of Media and Religion, the Social Science Computer Review, and Communication Yearbook. He has served as the editor of the Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, and currently serves on the editorial boards of four journals. He has written or edited five books. His latest book, Hollywood under Siege: Martin Scorsese, the Religious Right, and the Culture Wars, was published by the University Press of Kentucky in 2008.

Bryan C. Taylor, Associate Professor, specializes in interpretive research methods, organizational communication, and cultural studies. His principal research program involves studies of nuclear and (post-) Cold War communication. This research explores ideological articulations of gender, ethnicity, technology, and (ir)rationality in organizational and cultural discourse. He is also interested in cultural studies of identity, technology, gender, organization, and media. His research has been published in Journal of Applied Communication Research, Communication Research, Critical Studies in Mass Communication, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Quarterly Journal of Speech, Rhetoric and Public Affairs, Studies in Cultures, Organizations, and Societies, and elsewhere. Current projects include a book about the impact of the Cold War on the speech communication discipline. He received his B.A. (1983) from the University of Massachusetts, his M.A.(1987) and Ph.D. (1991) from the University of Utah. Prior to joining the CU-Boulder faculty in 1995 he served on the faculty at Texas A&M University. He was the 1998 recipient of the Young Investigator Award from the Rhetorical and Communication Theory Division of NCA.

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