Qualitative interviewing: the art of hearing data

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Sage Pubications, Aug 2, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 302 pages
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"This highly diffuse, personal orientation to research is an interesting contrast to more impersonal works and a useful reminder that the results of research are often intimately bound with the individuals who collect the data. The most likely audience for the work is beginning researchers who are interested in exploring avenues of qualitative research. The breezy style and anecdotal content may. . . make the work most suitable as a source for undergraduate methods courses.

--Herbert Snyder in Library and Information Science Research

"This work is intended to help students in social work, sociology, and political science develop skills in qualitative interviewing."

--Journal of Social Work Education

"This engaging and readable book is an introductory overview about how to design, collect, code, interpret, and present the results of qualitative research based upon interviews. . . . The authors are two experienced academics. . . . The book will be most appropriate for professors and students who are exploring qualitative research methods for the first time. When combined with more detailed articles and illustrative exercises, it could also serve very well as the organizing text for an advanced undergraduate or first graduate course in qualitative interviewing. Happily, its conversational tone and absence of pedagogical jargon also will make the book inviting and accessible to practitioners in new product development and market research. . . . This is a usable and enjoyable introduction to a research approach that has seen increasing use in recent years for new product and process introductions. Its primary audience is academicians and students who will find it a very good introductory text. Practitioners, particularly those who wish to ''get close to customers,'' will find here some useful advice about how to question customers and how to read their answers. More important, they will find out what to expect of qualitative market researchers who work with new product development or implementation teams."

--Patricia W. Meyers in The Journal of Product Innovation Management

Qualitative Interviewing provides a comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the theory and practice of qualitative interviewing. With this volume, qualitative researchers will learn how to design research based on interview data; stimulate conversation; absorb what is being said; and synthesize, analyze, and present an informed description of the data. The authors, both experienced teachers and researchers with nearly 50 years of post-Ph.D. research experience in qualitative interviewing, emphasize the importance of cultural, contextual, and personal influences on the sharing and unveiling of meaning. Their book links qualitative interviewing techniques with theories of how people communicate meaning. Qualitative Interviewing is an essential text for a wide range of students and social science researchers who do interviews as part of case studies or as ethnographic research.

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Contents

Foundations of Qualitative Interviewing
17
Designing
42
Building Conversational Partnerships
93
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Herbert J. Rubin is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Northern Illinois University. He is the author of Applied Social Research and (with Irene Rubin) four editions of Community Organizing and Development. He has written articles based on in-depth interviewing that explore rural development in Thailand, suburban land-use fights, cooperative housing and economic and community development. Both his monograph on Thailand, The Dynamics of Development in Rural Development and his book on community renewal in the United States, Renewing Hope within Neighborhoods of Despair: The Community-based Development Model, are based on participant observation and hundreds of in-depth interviews. He is currently using open ended in depth interviews as well as participant observation to study organizations that advocate for the poor.

Irene S. Rubin is Professor of Public Administration at Northern Illinois University.  She is the author of Running in the Red: The Political Dynamics of Urban Fiscal Stress, Shrinking the Federal Government, Class Tax and Power: Municipal Budgeting in the United States, and Balancing the Federal Budget: Eating the Seed Corn or Trimming the Herds, all four of which rely extensively on qualitative interviews.  She has written journal articles about citizen participation in local level government in Thailand, how universities adapt when their budgets are cut, and fights between legislative staffers and elected and appointed officials about unworkable policy proposals, all based on qualitative interviews.  She is in the middle of an interviewing project about how local officials view and use contracts with the private sector and with other governmental units to provide public services. 

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