Quality Software Project Management

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Prentice Hall Professional, 2002 - Computers - 1639 pages
Drawing on best practices identified at the Software Quality Institute and embodied in bodies of knowledge from the Project Management Institute, the American Society of Quality, IEEE, and the Software Engineering Institute, Quality Software Project Management teaches 34 critical skills that allow any manager to minimize costs, risks, and time-to-market. Written by leading practitioners Robert T. Futrell, Donald F. Shafer, and Linda I. Shafer, it addresses the entire project lifecycle, covering process, project, and people. It contains extensive practical resources-including downloadable checklists, templates, and forms.
 

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Its a fantastic book for Software Project Management students .
Its portion on "Analyzing & Quantifying Risks" is just AWESOME!
A must read for your exams .

Contents

CHAPTER
6
CHAPTER
12
Some Other Useful Definitions
13
CHAPTER 3
20
Project Management Skills
28
CHAPTER 5
41
Summary
49
Potential Market for Software
67
CHAPTER 23
878
Use of Tools
965
Software Design Tools
972
Software Maintenance Tools
979
Software Engineering Management Tools
985
Summary
994
Relation to the 34 Competencies
1000
CHAPTER 26
1038

Process Overview
71
SEI CMM Level 3 Is the Defined Level
77
IEEE 1074Process Map for Software Life Cycle Process
84
Customized Software Development Process
94
CHAPTER 4
101
Selection and Tailoring of Software Development Life Cycles
109
Selecting an Appropriate Software Development Life Cycle Model
146
Customizing the Life Cycle Model
152
Citations
158
Managing Domain Processes
161
Project Portfolio Management
177
Parts Need to Work Together
198
Summary
213
Creating the Work Breakdown Structure
237
CHAPTER 9
257
CHAPTER 10
306
CHAPTER 11
358
Assigning Resources
417
Assigning Responsibilities to Individuals
423
Project gement Resource Activities During Execution
430
APPENDIX
444
CHAPTER 14
461
Scheduling the Work
477
Leveling Resource Assignments
494
Learning Objectives for Chapter 16
509
CHAPTER 17
556
Evaluating the Project SRS
579
Determining Project Risks
587
CHAPTER 19
626
Reliability
699
Fault Tolerance
713
Relation to the 34 Competencies
727
The Basili GoalQuestionMetric Paradigm
740
A Basic Metrics Starter Set
756
The Metrics Plan
772
CHAPTER 22
782
CHAPTER 27
1071
CHAPTER 28
1087
Summary
1103
Communication and Motivation Skills of a Software Project Manager
1130
Communicating in Meetings
1151
Negotiating and Culture
1164
CHAPTER 30
1189
Ensuring the SQAP
1201
Problems for Review
1207
Who Is Involved in SCM?
1213
The Four Basic Requirements for an SCM System
1219
Legal Issues in Software
1241
Where We Are in the Product Development Life Cycle
1248
Project Management Skills
1256
Legal Risk Issues
1265
Summary
1274
Product Development Techniques
1280
Project Management Skills
1301
People Management Skills
1326
Visit the Case Study
1335
APPENDIX
1369
APPENDIX C
1391
Technology Business Plan
1406
Understanding Systems Engineering
1413
APPENDIX
1451
APPENDIX
1541
Glossary
1563
Bibliography
1575
Index
1611
359
1615
877
1618
1541
1622
1071
1630
625
1633
1391
1635
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

ROBERT T. FUTRELL is a consultant for Project Management Systems in Austin, TX, specializing in project management and software quality engineering. He was formerly a software project manager for Texas Instruments, and currently works as a Program Management Master and controller at Motorola in Austin.

DONALD F. SHAFER is co-founder and CTO of Athens Group Inc., a consultingfirm specializing in integrating technology strategy and software solutions.He is also an adjunct professor at Southwest Texas State University and hasworked for Boeing, Los Alamos National Laboratories, and Motorola.

LINDA I. SHAFER is an instructor and the mentor for the Software Quality Institute's Software Project Management Certificate Program at The University of Texas at Austin. She has worked for Motorola, IBM, leading consultancies, and major universities.

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