Quantitative Research in Communication

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SAGE Publications, Sep 12, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 242 pages
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Written for communication students, Quantitative Research in Communication provides practical, user-friendly coverage of how to use statistics, how to interpret SPSS printouts, how to write results, and how to assess whether the assumptions of various procedures have been met. Providing a strong conceptual orientation to techniques and procedures that range from the “moderately basic” to “highly advanced,” the book provides practical tips and suggestions for quantitative communication scholars of all experience levels.

In addition to important foundational information, each chapter that covers a specific statistical procedure includes suggestions for interpreting, explaining, and presenting results; realistic examples of how the procedure can be used to answer substantive questions in communication; sample SPSS printouts; and a detailed summary of a published communication journal article using that procedure.

Features

· Engaged Research application boxes stimulate thought and discussion, illustrating how particular research methods can be used to answer very practical, civic-minded questions.

· Realistic examples at the beginning of each chapter show how the chapter’s procedure could be used to answer a substantive research question.

· Examples and application activities geared toward the emerging trend of service learning encourage students to do projects oriented toward their community or campus.

· Summaries of journal articles demonstrate how to write statistical results in APA style and illustrate how real researchers use statistical procedures in a wide variety of contexts, such as tsunami warnings, date requests, and anti-drug public service announcements.

· How to Decipher Figures show students how to “read” the statistical shorthand presented in the quantitative results of an article and also, by implication, show them how to write up results .

Quantitative Research in Communication is ideal for courses in Quantitative Methods in Communication, Statistical Methods in Communication, Advanced Research Methods (undergraduate), and Introduction to Research Methods (Graduate) in departments of communication, educational psychology, psychology, and mass communication.

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About the author (2008)

Mike Allen is Professor in the Department of Communication at UW-Milwaukee. Mike received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University, his MA from the University of Wyoming, and his BA from Lewis and Clark College. His primary research interest is in the area of social influence in which he has more than 150 published works. The International Communication Association awarded him the John E. Hunter memorial award for life time achievement in communication research using meta-analysis. He is past editor of Communication Studies and current editor of Communication Monographs.

Scott Titsworth is an Associate Professor in the School of Communication Studies at Ohio University. Scott received his Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska, his MA from Missouri State University, and his BFA from Emporia State University. His primary research interest is instructional communication, with a particular emphasis in connections between affect, emotion, learning, and classroom communication. Scott teaches a variety of graduate and undergraduate classes including research methods, ANOVA, and Regression; in 2008 Scott was awarded the title of “University Professor” for excellence in the classroom.

Stephen K. Hunt is an Associate Professor, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Political Engagement Scholar, Co-Chair of ISU's American Democracy Project, and Associate Director of the School of Communication at Illinois State University. Stephen received his Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, his MA from the University of Northern Iowa, and his BFA from Emporia State University. He has published articles on several topics including instructional communication, persuasion, and communication pedagogy. His major research interests include the pedagogy of political engagement, critical thinking, communication skill assessment, and training/mentoring graduate students. In 2008, Stephen received the Stan and Sandy Rives Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education as well as the University Teaching Award.

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