Michigan Alumnus Quarterly Review: A Journal of University Perspectives, Volume 57

Front Cover
UM Libraries, 1950
Includes section: "Some Michigan books."
 

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Page 53 - So likewise ye, except ye utter by the tongue words easy to be understood, how shall it be known what is spoken? for ye shall speak into the air.
Page 16 - WORLD, thou choosest not the better part: It is not wisdom to be only wise, And on the inward vision close the eyes, But it is wisdom to believe the heart.
Page 59 - Such preparations shall be made as will completely obscure all Federal buildings and non-Federal buildings occupied by the Federal Government during an air raid for any period of time from visibility by reason of internal or external illumination. Such obscuration may be obtained either by blackout construction or by termination of the illumination.
Page 59 - In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away, when a body has been stripped down to its nakedness.
Page 57 - One qualification, however, must not be overlooked. A word which in itself embodies the most important part of the idea to be conveyed, especially when that idea is an emotional one, may often with advantage be a polysyllabic word. Thus it seems more forcible to say, " It is magnificent? than " It is grand" The word vast is not so powerful a one as stupendous.
Page 168 - Oelrich was provided by the Board of Governors of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies of the University of Michigan.
Page 59 - Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are, Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky...
Page 58 - ... called, with the comb-like row of blunt teeth, leaving just enough of the edge free to do its work. But this little affair had a blade only an inch and a half long by three quarters of an inch wide. It had a long slender handle, which took apart for packing, and was put together with the greatest ease. It was, in short, a lawn-mower for the masculine growth of which the proprietor wishes to rid his countenance.
Page 33 - ... now unappropriated, or the money arising from the sale of the same, where such lands have been already sold, and any land which may hereafter be granted or appropriated for such purpose, for the support and maintenance of such school, and may make the same a branch of the University for instruction in agriculture and the natural sciences connected therewith, and place the same under the supervision of the Regents of the University.
Page 17 - Bid, then, the tender light of faith to shine By which alone the mortal heart is led Unto the thinking of the thought divine.

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