Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science, Volume 2

Front Cover
Vol. 1-n.s., v. 8 contain the Transactions of the Microscopical Society of London, n.s., v. 1-16.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 138 - ... of the fine motion, and move it briskly backwards and forwards in both directions from the first position. Observe the expansion of the dark outline of the object, both when within and when without the focus. If the greater expansion, or coma, is when the object is without the focus, or...
Page 295 - May 24, 1853." On the probable Errors of the Eye and the Ear in Transit Observations. By the Rev. TR Robinson, DD, President of the Royal Irish Academy. With respect to the usual mode of recording transit observations, and the invention recently introduced at American observatories for accomplishing the same object by means of electricity, the author remarks, that the two systems not merely employ different senses to co-operate with sight, but that...
Page 78 - The area of the delta being about 13,600 square statute miles, and the quantity of solid matter annually brought down by the river 3,702,758,400 cubic feet, it must have taken 67,000 years for the formation of the whole...
Page 93 - ... it acquires no gastric teeth, and never attains perfection in form or size. If, at the same time, it be confined within a narrow cell, or space, it grows only to such a size as will enable it to move about freely; thus adapting itself to the necessities of its restricted state of existence.
Page 15 - ... the first effect is the production of the yellow or cinnamon-coloured compound of iodine and quinine, which forms as a small circular spot ; the alcohol separates in little drops, which by a sort of repulsive movement drive the fluid away ; after a time the acid liquid again flows over the spot, and the polarizing crystals of sulphate of iodo-quinine are slowly produced in beautiful rosettes. This succeeds best without the aid of heat.
Page 41 - In both lungs there were scattered through all the lobes a moderate number of whitish-grey, or greyish-red medullary tubera, varying in size from that of a pin's-head to that of a...
Page 294 - ... field of the microscope or beyond the angle of aperture of the object-glass is the ordinary cause of the outlines of objects becoming visible ; and in these cases, an increase of the angular aperture of the object-glass will impair their distinctness, because it will allow of the admission of those rays which would otherwise have been refracted from the field, and the margins will become more luminous and less contrasted with the luminous field. The cause of the distinctness of an object by refraction...
Page 80 - At the line of junction, a somewhat more condensed tissue, which breaks up, like a great deal of the red pulp, into spindle-shaped bodies, and those fibres with onesided endoplasts, described by Kolliker, may be found ; but this tissue belongs as much to the red pulp as to the Malpighian body. In the Sheep, on the other hand, I find, to quote Mr. Wharton Jones's words, that — " Examined with a low magnifying power, the Malpighian corvesicles present the appearance of thick-walled, glandular vesicles,...
Page 16 - ... crystals of sulphate of iodo-quinine are slowly produced in beautiful rosettes. This succeeds best without the aid of heat. To render these crystals evident, it merely remains to bring the...
Page 240 - Fungi, which do not appear to have been hitherto described, and as their microscropic structure is curious and interesting, the following account of them may be acceptable to some of the readers of the

Bibliographic information