Queen of the Confederacy: The Innocent Deceits of Lucy Holcombe Pickens

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University of North Texas Press, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 253 pages
"Submissiveness is not my role, but certain platitudes on certain occasions are among the innocent deceits of the sex." A strong character with a fervent belief in woman's changing place, Lucy Holcombe Pickens (1832-1899) was not content to live the life of a typical nineteenth-century Southern belle. Wife of Francis Wilkinson Pickens, the secessionist governor of South Carolina on the eve of the Civil War, Lucy was determined to make her mark in the world. She married "the right man," feeling that "a woman with wealth or prestige garnered from her husband's position could attain great power." Lucy urged Pickens to accept a diplomatic mission to the court of Tsar Alexander II of Russia, and in St. Petersburg Lucy captivated the Tsar and his retinue with her beauty and charm. Upon returning to the states, she became First Lady of South Carolina just in time to encourage a Confederate unit named in her honor (The Holcombe Legion) off to war.

The only woman to have her image engraved on Confederacy paper currency. Heralded as the uncrowned "Queen of the Confederacy".
 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE 18301840 Changing Times
1
CHAPTER TWO 18401846 Riches have taken to themselves wings and flown away
8
CHAPTER THREE 18461849 If she wears blue stockings she contrives to let her petticoats hide them
18
CHAPTER FOUR 1850 A stranger in a strange land
27
CHAPTER FIVE 1851 My spirit is restless and longs for activity
36
CHAPTER SIX 1851 The only kindred blood I ever knew stains the green shore of Cuba
43
CHAPTER SEVEN 18521857 My home is in the prairied West and God is nearer us than fashion
49
CHAPTER EIGHT 1857 The Marriage Mart of the South
62
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN 1861 It was grandit was awful
134
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 1861 Submissiveness is not my role
141
CHAPTER NINETEEN 18611863 The only comfort in all this misery is a little good talk now and then
148
CHAPTER TWENTY 18631865 A volcano under that exterior of stillness and glitter
158
CHAPTER TWENTYONE 18651869 Out of the dead cold ashes life again
165
CHAPTER TWENTYTWO 18691875 Rouse yourself from the sweet sad dream and face the battle of life
177
CHAPTER TWENTYTHREE 18761893 The Joan of Arc of Carolina
184
CHAPTER TWENTYFOUR 18941899 We do not forget
192

CHAPTER NINE 1858 The heart hath reason which reason knows nothing of
73
CHAPTER TEN 1858 talking of elevated and mighty themes
79
CHAPTER ELEVEN 1858 The confused sound of an unknown language made me feel my isolation
87
CHAPTER TWELVE 1858 It was very marked and not known to happen before to a foreigner
92
photo gallery
100
CHAPTER THIRTEEN 18591860 I suspect it will look more like a Moscovite Don Cossack than an honest American child
101
CHAPTER FOURTEEN 1860 There is nothing real about European society but its hollowness
108
CHAPTER FIFTEEN 1860 I find myself going up the hill to Wyalusing
116
CHAPTER SIXTEEN 1861 I am where duty honor demand me
126
Epilogue
199
Appendix A ON LEAVING VILLA DE LANSKOI
203
Appendix B PICKENS GENEALOGY
206
Appendix C HOLCOMBE GENEALOGY
208
Notes
211
Bibliography
235
Index
243
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About the author (2002)

ELIZABETH WITTENMYER LEWIS, born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, attended Susquehanna University and Pennsylvania State College. She graduated from Jefferson Medical School with an RN and served as first lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps in World War II. She married a Southerner and spent most of her life in Virginia, Florida, Missouri, and Texas, with the exception of six years in London. She continued her education at Rice University in Houston.

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