Queen of the Porch: And Other Droll Stories

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The Roycrofters, 1920 - 125 pages
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Page 13 - Out, damned spot! out, I say! — One: two : why, then 't is time to do 't. — Hell is murky ! — Fie, my lord, fie! a soldier, and afeard? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account ? — Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him.
Page 27 - JB's have made similar resolves. After he got out almost everybody gave him the Icy Mitt, but finally he Accepted a Position (or as some might say, Found a Job) in a Factory. He started in at four dollars a week, working with the boys, for jail-birds can not afford to be either fastidious or finicky. They have to take whatever offers. Responsibilities gravitate to the person who can shoulder them, and power flows to the man who knows how.
Page 64 - ... such diabolical havoc of a double moral standard. There can be but one standard — that of moral equality. Instead of being so painfully anxious about the 'financial prospects' of a young man, * * * it is time that we put health first and money second. * * * Let a father ask the young man, as the leading question, whether he is physically clean ; insist that he shall go to his family physician, and if he gives him a clean bill of health, then his financial prospects can be gone into. But his...
Page 119 - ... stage door!" And everybody roared but Debs — he never saw it. Debs is a very superior man. He is more than an agitator, for he has a generous, welling heart of love. The years have tamed him and educated him. His graduation from Unionism was a great stride in advance. The union is exclusive — it sets class against class. Debs knows this. Now he would make us all free. He is as sensitive as an Aeolian harp played upon by the summer breeze. Steve Reynolds is just as fine, and in some respects...
Page 47 - Cable was furious with disappointment and rage. He declared Mark had grossly insulted him. He protested that all he had said and done was done in love, and for Mark's benefit, and he declared he would not again speak to Mark until he apologized. Major Pond was sorely troubled. There were seventeen dates ahead, and if these men parted now it meant the loss of thousands of dollars. The Major begged Mark to apologize and heal the breach, but Mark smiled grimly and said the little Creole catcher could...
Page 25 - said Mr. Shonts. And as he spoke he stood up and placed his hand upon a quart bottle of Stafford's red ruling ink that was on his desk ; and in someway that bottle of ink shot straight at big Tim Driscoll — all in a flash. The bottle struck Tim square on the forehead and exploded into ten thousand and four pieces. Then Shonts closed in on his man and landed short arm blows left and right ; upper cuts were sent home, and fancy taps in the solar plexus were quickly interspersed with stiff punches...
Page 48 - But never did they speak when they met, altho they traveled together five thousand miles, ate at the same table and stopped at the same hotels. Whenever Cable would enter a room where Mark and the Major were, the entrance of Cable was the cue for Mark to indulge him in a knockwood Demonstration. Mark says he holds no enmity toward George, but he has ever refused to apologize, and thinks that George should apologize to him for trying to take away his religion, which consists in Every Man Minding His...
Page 77 - ... consider this item as concerning the Drama or relating to Travel. It is very kind in the Commonwealth to explain how the chemise is to be worn; for if Boston did not give the cue the ladies of the land might keep right on wearing the chemise outside their cloaks for all time, after the manner of Ah Sid. Further attention to the article reveals this, which is evidently History: If you do not like a chemise, you will find a little low neck knit shirt makes the best corset cover. White drawers are...
Page 77 - ... Edward W. Townsend. The Commonwealth advertises upon its cover that the paper is devoted to " Literature, Science, History, Art, Society, Travel, Music and the Drama." I am uncertain whether Dr. Hale, the reverend editor, desires us to consider this item as concerning the Drama or relating to Travel. It is very kind in the Commonwealth to explain how the chemise is to be worn; for if Boston did not give the cue the ladies of the land might keep right on wearing the chemise outside their cloaks...
Page 75 - ... in the Three-Minute-Class. That male man is guilty of contributory negligence after the fact, is true, but to trace the primal cause to his transom is to follow a false clue. The average man is quite as capable as the average woman. Colonel Bok is no longer a fit leader for the ladies

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