Quentins

Front Cover
Penguin, 2003 - Fiction - 488 pages
8 Reviews

Is it possible to tell the story of a generation and a city through the history of a restaurant?
Ella Brady thinks so. She wants to film a documentary about Quentins that will capture the spirit of Dublin from the 1970s to the present day. And Quentins has a thousand stories to tell: tales of love, of betrayal, of revenge; of times when it looked ready for success and times when it seemed as if it must close in failure. But as Ella uncovers more of what has gone on at Quentins, she begins to wonder whether some secrets should be kept that way...

With Quentins, Maeve Binchy follows her bestselling Scarlet Feather with a new book that delivers the hallmark storytelling that has kept millions of her readers happy for more than twenty years.

 

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I loved this story

User Review  - Missa - Borders

The charecters are so interesting and well developed. The book is wonderful. It must be a re-print, because I read it several years ago. Highly recommended. Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
21
IV
55
V
77
VI
155
VII
168
VIII
181
IX
193
XI
264
XII
288
XIII
353
XIV
355
XV
370
XVI
378
XVII
392
XVIII
419

X
249

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About the author (2003)

Maeve Binchy was born in County Dublin and educated at the Holy Child convent in Killiney and at University College, Dublin. After a spell as a teacher she joined The Irish Times. Her first novel, Light a Penny Candle, was published in 1982, and she went on to write more than twenty books, all of them bestsellers. Several have been adapted for film and television, most notably Circle of Friends and Tara Road, which was an Oprah's Book Club selection. She was married to writer and broadcaster Gordon Snell for thirty-five years. She passed away in 2012 at the age of seventy-two.


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