Quiet Revolution in the South: The Impact of the Voting Rights Act, 1965-1990

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Princeton University Press, 1994 - Political Science - 503 pages
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This work is the first systematic attempt to measure the impact of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, commonly regarded as the most effective civil rights legislation of the century. Marshaling a wealth of detailed evidence, the contributors to this volume show how blacks and Mexican Americans in the South, along with the Justice Department, have used the act and the U.S. Constitution to overcome the resistance of white officials to minority mobilization.

The book tells the story of the black struggle for equal political participation in eight core southern states from the end of the Civil War to the 1980s--with special emphasis on the period since 1965. The contributors use a variety of quantitative methods to show how the act dramatically increased black registration and black and Mexican-American office holding. They also explain modern voting rights law as it pertains to minority citizens, discussing important legal cases and giving numerous examples of how the law is applied. Destined to become a standard source of information on the history of the Voting Rights Act, Quiet Revolution in the South has implications for the controversies that are sure to continue over the direction in which the voting rights of American ethnic minorities have evolved since the 1960s.

 

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Contents

The Recent Evolution of Voting Rights Law Affecting Racial and Language Minorities
21
Alabama
38
Georgia
67
Louisiana
103
Mississippi
136
North Carolina
155
South Carolina
191
Texas
233
The Effect of Municipal Election Structure on Black Representation in Eight Southern States
301
The Impact of the Voting Rights Act on Minority Representation Black Officeholding in Southern State Legislatures and Congressional Delegations
335
The Impact of the Voting Rights Act on Black and White Voter Registration in the South
351
The Voting Rights Act and the Second Reconstruction
378
NOTES
389
BIBLIOGRAPHY
463
CONTRIBUTORS
485
INDEX OF LEGAL CASES
489

Virginia
271
THE SOUTHWIDE PERSPECTIVE
299

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About the author (1994)

Davidson is Professor of Sociology at Rice University.

Grofman is Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Irvine. He has a PhD in Political Science.

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