Quite Honestly

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, May 4, 2006 - Fiction - 206 pages

Life couldn t be better for Lucinda Purefoy. Granted it s a little embarrassing, her father being the Bishop of Aldershot, but she s got a steady boyfriend, a degree in social sciences and the offer of a job in advertising. With all this, she felt she should pay back her debt to society and do a little good in the world .

That s why she joined SCRAP (short for Social Carers, Reformers and Praeceptors ), an organization which trains girls like Lucy to become the guide, philosopher and friend to ex-convicts coming out of prison, to find them a job, a home and to encourage them to kick the habit of stealing things.

And so Lucy finds herself standing outside the gates of Wormwood Scrubs, on a windy March morning, waiting to greet her first SCRAP client , a career-burglar called Terry Keegan. What happens next confounds expectations and produces a story full of surprises.

With a cast of characters that rivals anything in his famous Rumpole stories and a compulsive plot, Quite Honestly is a wonderfully comic novel, packed with John Mortimer s entertaining reflections on crime.

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QUITE HONESTLY

User Review  - Kirkus

Fate throws together a cinematically mismatched pair; Cupid deftly aims his arrows; cute fun ensues. Taking a breather from legal thrillers (Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders, 2004, etc ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - juniperSun - LibraryThing

Amusing light comedy. Most of the British idioms can be understood in context. Young naive woman works as preceptor for newly-released con. Read full review

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About the author (2006)

John Mortimer is a novelist, playwright and former practising barrister. Among his many publications are several volumes of Rumpole stories and a trilogy of political novels (Paradise Postponed, Titmuss Regained and The Sound of Trumpets) featuring Leslie Titmuss. Sir John received a knighthood for his services to the arts in 1998.

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