Quo Vadis: A Tale of the Time of Nero

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, May 23, 2012 - Fiction - 432 pages
0 Reviews
A young Roman soldier falls in love only to discover that his sweetheart belongs to a strange new cult—a group that meets in secret to worship their one and only god. The romance of Marcus Vinicius and Lygia unfolds amid the decadence of ancient Rome, where bloodthirsty crowds flock to gladiatorial contests and a mad emperor sets fire to his own city. With its captivating blend of fictional and real characters, this historical novel contrasts the worldly opulence of the Roman aristocracy with the poverty, simplicity, and spiritual power of the early Christians.
Quo Vadis ("Where are you going?") was one of the world's first bestsellers and contributed toward the author's 1905 receipt of the Nobel Prize in literature. Originally written in Polish, its tale of the Roman suppression of Christianity echoes the Russian domination of Poland. This edition features Jeremiah Curtin's English translation of Henryk Sienkiewicz's enduring epic.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Far more celebrated than any of his positivist contemporaries, Henryk Sienkiewicz began as a journalist and achieved considerable renown with his account of a two-year journey to the United States. Between 1882 and 1888 he wrote three historical novels dealing with political and military events in seventeenth-century Poland: With Fire and Sword, The Deluge (1886), and Fire in the Steppe (1888, also translated as Pan Michael). Although superficial in its analysis of historical events, the trilogy gained enormous popularity both in Poland and in other Slavic countries thanks to Sienkiewicz's masterful use of epic techniques and of the seventeenth-century colloquial idiom. Even more popular, if artistically far weaker, was his Quo Vadis? (1896), a novel about Rome in the age of Nero (Sienkiewicz's fame in the West is chiefly based on this work). Another historical novel, The Teutonic Knights (1900), deals with the fifteenth-century struggle between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Order. Henryk Sienkiewicz was awarded The Nobel prize in Literature for 1905 "because of his outstanding merits as an epic writer".

Bibliographic information