RAMBLES IN THE PATH OF THE STEAM-HORSE

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1855
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Page 176 - Proud names, who once the reins of empire held ; ' In arms who triumph'd, or in arts excell'd ; Chiefs, graced with scars and prodigal of blood ; Stern patriots, who for sacred freedom stood ; Just men, by whom impartial laws were given ; And saints who taught and led the way to heaven.
Page 323 - And see the rivers how they run, Through woods and meads, in shade and sun, Sometimes swift, sometimes slow, Wave succeeding wave, they go A various journey to the deep, Like human life to endless sleep!
Page 184 - The passage of the Patowmac through the Blue ridge is perhaps one of the most stupendous scenes in nature. You stand on a very high point of land. On your right comes up the Shenandoah, having ranged along the foot of the mountain an hundred miles to seek a vent.
Page 1 - may go and play," While I manage the world by myself. But harness me down with your iron bands, Be sure of your curb and rein, For I scorn the strength of your puny hands As the tempest scorns a chain.
Page 178 - Singing through the forests, Rattling over ridges, Shooting under arches, Rumbling over bridges, Whizzing through the mountains, Buzzing o'er the vale, — Bless me ! this is pleasant, Riding on the rail ! I'M GROWING OLD.
Page 42 - The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad ; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.
Page 46 - Maryland, assisted by Charles Carroll. of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of American Independence, and under the direction of the president and directors of the Railroad Company.
Page 418 - ... is unseen, fills the air with fragrance. The variety of the wild fruit and flowering shrubs is so great, and such the profusion of the blossoms with which they are bowed down, that the eye is regaled almost to satiety. The gaiety of the prairie, its embellishments...
Page 199 - If the view from the top be painful and intolerable, that from below is delightful in an equal extreme. It is impossible for the emotions arising from the sublime, to be felt beyond what they are here: so beautiful an arch, so elevated, so light, and springing as it were up to heaven, the rapture of the spectator is really indescribable!
Page 71 - With half-shut eyes, and puckered cheeks, and teeth Presented bare against the storm, plods on. One hand secures his hat, save when with both He brandishes his pliant length of whip, Resounding oft, and never heard in vain.

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