Readying a Company for a Catastrophic Event: A Template for Success

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AuthorHouse, 2010 - Business & Economics - 208 pages
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Disasters are possible -- maybe inevitable. Although their consequences may be uncontrollable, the effects are, to some extent, and in many cases, quite controllable, if proper attention is given to planning for a disastrous event. An organization cannot necessarily depend on help when a disaster strikes. It must be prepared to tackle the disaster on its own. This is especially true if the event is area wide, regional, or national in scope. This book essentially is a stand-alone publication that provides the "how to" ready an organization for a catastrophic or lesser event. It is a template for an organization to internally develop in a cost-effective manner a plan to cover prevention techniques to minimize potentially adverse consequences from a disastrous event; how to prepare for an event, such as, planning, training personnel, and acquiring and maintaining the supplies and information that will be crucial in responding to and handling a crisis event, as well as recovering from the event. Strategic methods are given on these processes, whether the event is natural, technological, or man-made. The disaster management system is defined through its seven principal tools. Numerous examples are given to facilitate a better understanding of the disaster management system. Required teams and task forces are identified, as well as internal and external information that may be needed, Guidelines are given for determining an organization's critical assets; determining their vulnerability and rating and ranking critical assets. Other areas covered include pre- and post-financial issues; impact determination; fiscal analyses and decisions needed to be made (pertinent questions to be asked) in order to make prudent decisions); organizational areas of concern (legal, security, HR, business, etc.); incident and crises responses to be undertaken; plans to be developed; training of personnel; recovery and closeout operations; tabletop exercise scenarios; and much more.
 

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Contents

The Basic Disaster Management System
1
Maintenance
7
List of Tables
11
Team Responsibilities
13
Team and Task Forces Inputs and Outputs
15
Decision
19
Disastrous Events to Consider
27
Types of Events
28
Mitigation Cost Time and Strategies
64
Recovery Impact Costs
65
Graphic Representation of Readiness Response and Recovery Costs for Three Events
66
Event Dollar Position Summary
68
Dollar Position Data summary
69
Decisions
73
Major Areas of Information Determination by Teams and Task Forces
75
Training
81

Critical Assets
33
Tiered Event Consequent Diagram A Tool
34
Event Results Matrix
36
Vulnerable Assets with Mitigation Strategies
40
Asset Ranking
42
Item Cost and Other Information
46
Impact Determination
53
Event Impact Rating
54
Event Risk Factor Based on Probability and Frequency of Occurrence and Impact
56
Event Risk Factor Based on Probability of Occurrence and Impact
57
Event Risk Ranking
58
RiskImpact Matrix
59
Fiscal Analyses
61
Readiness Costs
62
Event Response and Recovery Need Costs
63
Overall Event Response
86
Responses
87
Timeline of Response and Recovery Activities
89
Recovery
91
Interim Facility Plan
103
References
109
Appendix B Forms
121
Decision Questions
131
Appendix F Monetary Issues
139
Tabletop Exercise and Two Scenarios
149
Appendix J Responsibilities of Command Post Units
165
Recovery DecisionMaking Information
175
Appendix N Candidate Material for Response and Recovery
181
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About the author (2010)

The author Paul C. Constant, Jr. has over 61 years of experience in the scientific research business, managing large, complex, multi-discipline, and long-term programs; directing engineering operations; and leading teams in the disaster management area. He is the author of nearly 100 technical paper and book publications, technical paper presentations, and technical reports in the fields of disaster management, engineering, mathematics, management, and quality assurance. His more recent management experience includes the disaster management process, having worked in the development of disaster plans and the processes for disaster prevention and preparedness, incident and crisis responses, and recovery from various types of disasters. He has conceived of new effective and efficient means to accomplish complex tasks in the disaster management area. He is a retired professional engineer in the states of Missouri and Kansas. He has been a member of engineering and mathematical technical societies. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards. He is a veteran of WW II serving overseas as an officer in the U.S. Army Signal Corps 58th Sig. Battalion, 6th Army.

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