ROI at Work: Best-practice Case Studies from the Real World

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American Society for Training and Development, 2005 - Business & Economics - 174 pages
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ROI at Work builds on ASTD's earlier work on measuring return-on-investment (ROI) of performance improvement interventions and introduces even more examples of ROI application in the government sector as well as a variety of industries, including the telecommunications, financial services, technology, and automotive industries. Training, human resources development (HRD), human resources, and performance improvement professionals will learn valuable lessons from these detailed real-world case studies as they work to contribute to the strategic goals of their organizations. College instructors and students will also find value in this book as a supplement to standard HRD textbooks. Researchers and consultants will find that this book provides solid evidence of the validity of ROI measurement and evaluation practices.
 

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Contents

MEASURING ROI
1
CONTRACT SPECIALIST EMPOWERMENT
13
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TRAINING
23
ASTDS HPI CERTIFICATE PROGRAM
37
FORECASTING THE ROI OF SALES TRAINING
59
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN FOUNDATIONS COURSE
71
MEASURING THE ROI IN A COACHING PROGRAM
81
INCOMPANY MANAGEMENT TRAINING
97
EFFECTIVE MEETING SKILLS
103
MEASURING ROI FOR A LEADERSHIP
125
AN ROI IMPACT STUDY ON LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
143
MEASURING THE ROI OF AN ELEARNING
159
REFERENCES
169
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Page xi - ... case it is possible to identify areas that could benefit from refinement and improvement. That is part of the learning process, to build on the work of other people. Although the evaluation processes are contextual, the methods and techniques can be used in other organizations.
Page 5 - An ROI calculation for an unnecessary program will likely yield a negative value. This is a realistic barrier for many programs. Fear Some HRD departments do not pursue ROI because of fear of failure or fear of the unknown.
Page 6 - Managers do not want to see the results of training and development expressed in monetary values. • If the CEO does not ask for the ROI, he or she is not expecting it. • As manager of HRD, I have a professional, competent staff; therefore, I do not have to justify the effectiveness of our programs.

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