Rabbit, Run

Front Cover
Fawcett Columbine, 1996 - Fiction - 264 pages
47 Reviews
Rabbit, Run is the book that established John Updike as one of the major American novelists of his—or any other—generation. Its hero is Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, a onetime high-school basketball star who on an impulse deserts his wife and son. He is twenty-six years old, a man-child caught in a struggle between instinct and thought, self and society, sexual gratification and family duty—even, in a sense, human hard-heartedness and divine Grace. Though his flight from home traces a zigzag of evasion, he holds to the faith that he is on the right path, an invisible line toward his own salvation as straight as a ruler's edge.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - weird_O - LibraryThing

Rabbit, Run by John Updike [Rabbit, Run] is the novel that launched John Updike's long, celebrated writing career. Though not his first novel, it is the one that prompted critics and readers to take ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thornton37814 - LibraryThing

Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom was once the star of the basketball team. Now he is the "old guy", married to a wife with an alcohol problem, and just wanting to escape. He attempts to drive to Florida but ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
50
Section 3
76
Section 4
142
Section 5
149
Section 6
181
Section 7
223
Section 8
306
Section 9
327
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

John Updike was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, in 1932. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954 and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker. His novels have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and the William Dean Howells Medal. In 2007 he received the Gold Medal for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. John Updike died in January 2009.

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