Racetrack Betting: The Professor's Guide to Strategies

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1991 - Business & Economics - 195 pages
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A day at the races, with its colorful variety and fast-paced action, appeals to people from all walks of life. Not surprisingly, the idea of going home with a few more dollars than when one arrived is part of horseracing's charm. In this entertaining but substantive volume, two distinguished economists, who happen to be horseracing buffs, outline a tested strategy for placing bets that will increase the reader's chances of a happy outcome at the track. The authors are the first to point out that getting rich at the racetrack is unlikely. They do maintain, however, that with attention to their systematic approach, the racing fan can achieve the best possible chance at winning. In the process, the reader learns some of the most important measurement techniques in the social sciences, as well as the basic methods of market analysis.
 

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Contents

Horse Racing and the Betting Scene
1
CHAPTER 2 Why You Usually Lose at the Racetrack
31
The Popular Literature
43
CHAPTER 4 Why Do People Bet?
67
CHAPTER 5 How Do We Assess Racetrack Betting Evidence?
87
CHAPTER 6 The Evidence from Win Place and Show Betting
105
CHAPTER 7 The Evidence from Exotic Bets
153
CHAPTER 8 Can You Win at the Racetrack?
173
Glossary of Terms
185
References
189
Index
193
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

PETER ASCH is the late Professor of Economics at Rutgers University.

RICHARD E. QUANDT is Professor of Economics at Princeton University.

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