Racism and Justice: The Case for Affirmative Action

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Cornell University Press, 1991 - Political Science - 139 pages
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Affirmative action: does it really counteract racism? Is it morally justifiable? In her timely and tough-minded book, Gertrude Ezorsky addresses these central issues in the ongoing controversy surrounding affirmative action, and comes up with some convincing answers.
 

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Racism and justice: the case for affirmative action

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This slender tract argues passionately that affirmative action has been and continues to be a necessary social policy to correct centuries of institutional racism directed at descendants of African ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction i
2
Overt and Institutional Racism
9
Remedies for Racism
28
Instrumental Criticism
55
Moral Perspectives on Affirmative
73
Unqualified Blacks as Unaffected
79
Meritocratic Critics
88
Overt and Institutional Racism
97
Remedies for Institutional Racism
109
A Response to Moral Critics of
132
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