Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social Movements

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SAGE, Aug 18, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 440 pages
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This is an entirely new edition of the author's 1984 study (originally published by South End Press) of radical media and movements. The first and second sections are original to this new edition. The first section explores social and cultural theory in order to argue that radical media should be a central part of our understanding of media in history. The second section weaves an historical and international tapestry of radical media to illustrate their centrality and diversity, from dance and graffiti to video and the internet and from satirical prints and street theatre to culture-jamming, subversive song, performance art and underground radio. The section also includes consideration of ultra-rightist media as a key contrast case. The book's third section provides detailed case studies of the anti-fascist media explosion of 1974-75 in Portugal, Italy's long-running radical media, radio and access video in the USA, and illegal media in the dissolution of the former Soviet bloc dictatorships.

 

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Contents

Radical Media Intersect Media Theory
1
Chapter 1 Popular Culture Audiences and Radical Media
3
Chapter 2 Power Hegemony Resistance
12
Chapter 3 Social Movements the Public Sphere Networks
23
Chapter 4 Community Democracy Dialogue and Radical Media
38
Chapter 5 Art Aesthetics Radical Media and Communication
56
Two Models
67
Chapter 7 Religion Ethnicity and the International Dimension
75
Woodcuts Satirical Prints Flyers Photomontage Posters and Murals
158
Chapter 15 Radio
181
Chapter 16 Film and Video
192
Tamara Villarreal Ford and Genève Gil
201
Part III Extended Case Studies
235
The Collapse of Dictatorship and Colonialism 19741975
237
Three Decades of Radical Media
266
Chapter 20 Access Television and Grassroots Political Communication in the United States
299

Chapter 8 Repressive Radical Media
88
Chapter 9 Conclusions
97
Communicative Rebellion Historically and Globally
101
Chapter 10 Public Speech Dance Jokes and Song
105
Chapter 11 Graffiti and Dress
121
Chapter 12 Popular Theater Street Theater Performance Art and CultureJamming
130
Chapter 13 The Press
143
Chapter 21 KPFA Berkeley and Free Radio Berkeley
325
Chapter 22 Samizdat in the Former Soviet Bloc
354
Chapter 23 A Hexagon by Way of a Conclusion
388
References
396
Index
422
About the Authors
425
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

John Downing is Professor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the Univeristy of Texas, Austin. He is a co-editor of Questioning the Media (1990) and has contributed to the journals Media, Culture & Society and Discourse & Society

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