Ragged Dick: Or, Street Life in New York with the Boot-blacks

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John C. Winston Company, 1910 - 262 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
18
III
27
IV
36
V
45
VI
56
VII
65
VIII
75
XV
142
XVI
152
XVII
162
XVIII
172
XIX
182
XX
192
XXI
203
XXII
213

IX
83
X
95
XI
105
XII
116
XIII
124
XIV
132
XXIII
224
XXIV
233
XXV
242
XXVI
249
XXVII
257
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Page 262 - Here ends the story of Ragged Dick. As Fosdick said, he is Ragged Dick no longer. He has taken a step upward, and is determined to mount still higher. There are fresh adventures in store for him, and for others who have been introduced in these pages. Those who have felt interested in his early life will find his history continued in a new volume, forming the second of the series, to be called, — FAME AND FORTUNE; OR, THE PROGRESS OF RICHARD HUNTER.
Page 14 - Our ragged hero wasn'ta model boy in all respects. I am afraid he swore sometimes, and now and then he played tricks upon unsophisticated boys from the country, or gave a wrong direction to honest old gentlemen unused to the city.
Page 12 - It isn't anywhere else," said Dick, and Dick spoke the truth there. "What tailor do you patronize ?" asked the gentleman, surveying Dick's attire. "Would you like to go to the same one?" asked Dick, shrewdly. "Well, no; it strikes me that he didn't give you a very good fit." "This coat once belonged to General Washington," said Dick comically. "He wore it all through the Revolution, and it got torn some, 'cause he fit so hard. When he died he told his widder to give it to some smart young feller...
Page 16 - He was above doing anything mean or dishonorable. He would not steal, or cheat^ or impose upon younger boys, but was frank and straight-forward, manly and self-reliant. His nature was a noble one, and had saved him from all mean faults.
Page vii - ... serial story to the pages of the SCHOOLMATE, a well-known juvenile magazine, during the year 1867. While in course of publication, it was received with so many evidences of favor that it has been rewritten and considerably enlarged, and is now presented to the public as the first volume of a series intended to illustrate the life and experiences of the friendless and vagrant children who are now numbered by thousands in New York and other cities.
Page viii - The author hopes that, while the volumes in this series may prove interesting as stories, they may also have the effect of enlisting the sympathies of his readers in behalf of the unfortunate children whose life is described...
Page 15 - I guess he wouldn't want to stay long if he did get in," thought Ragged Dick, hitching up his pants. "Leastways I shouldn't. They're so precious glad to see you that they won't let you go, but board you gratooitous, and never send in no bills." Another of Dick's faults was his extravagance. Being always wide-awake and ready for business, he earned enough to have supported him comfortably and respectably. There were not a few young clerks who employed Dick from time to time in his professional capacity,...
Page 95 - You always seem to be in good spirits." "No, I ain't always. Sometimes I have the blues." "When?" "Well, once last whiter it was awful cold, and there was big holes in my shoes, and my gloves and all my warm clothes was at the tailor's. I felt as if life was sort of tough, and I'd like it if some rich man would adopt me, and give me plenty to eat and drink and wear, without my havin
Page 81 - You began in the right way when you determined never to steal, or do anything mean or dishonorable, however strongly tempted to do so. That will make people have confidence in you when they come to know you. But, in order to succeed well, you must manage to get as good an education as you can. Until you do, you cannot get a position in an office or counting-room, even to run errands." "That's so," said Dick soberly. "I never thought how awful ignorant I was till now.
Page 111 - I will," said Dick, resolutely. "I aint always goin' to black boots for a livin'." "All labor is respectable, my lad, and you have no cause to be ashamed of any honest business; yet when you can get something to do that promises better for your future prospects, I advise you to do so. Till then earn your living in the way you are accustomed to, avoid extravagance, and save up a little money if you can.

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