Railroad Schemes

Front Cover
Thorndike Press, Feb 1, 1998 - Fiction - 429 pages
2 Reviews
Lily Viner's father was a hard man, a claim-jumper and petty highwayman working out of Virginia City, Nevada Territory, but he was all the family she had. So when a stagecoach robbery goes bad, and he is killed in the shootout, she is left completely alone. But it is Lily's good fortune that the robbery was planned by the strange Irish outlaw known as King Callahan, who sees in her the sister he left behind and who refuses to leave her to the mercy of the citizens of Virginia City. King Callahan is a criminal, but he's a man with a mission as well. He hates the railroads, he hates the men who build them, and he believes that if the Southern Pacific succeeds in building a line across the desert into Los Angeles, it will be the end of the gracious Spanish colonial city that he has made his home. He intends to do everything in his power to stop the railroad.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

Railroad Schemes by Cecelia Holland was an enjoyable read, a western adventure novel about a young girl whose father drags her into a life of thievery. When her first excursion outside of the law goes ... Read full review

RAILROAD SCHEMES

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

An unlikely banditry duo—a 30ish Irish ĒmigrĒ and a 15-year- old girl who packs a Remington and reads Jane Austen—profit (and lose) in the 1850 railroad wars: Holland's latest gritty, action ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
23
Section 3
42
Section 4
59
Section 5
73
Section 6
90
Section 7
112
Section 8
135
Section 14
252
Section 15
266
Section 16
289
Section 17
306
Section 18
321
Section 19
333
Section 20
349
Section 21
367

Section 9
152
Section 10
180
Section 11
195
Section 12
214
Section 13
232
Section 22
383
Section 23
401
Section 24
429
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Born in Henderson, Nevada, Cecelia Holland was educated at Pennsylvania State University and Connecticut College, where she received her B.A. degree. She has served as a visiting professor of English at Connecticut College since 1979. Holland's historical novels have received broad critical acclaim. According to one critic, she "proves that there can be more to historical thrillers than swordplay and seduction." (Time) Among her novels is City of God (1979), which is set in Rome during the period of the Borgia family. Told from the point of view of Nicolas, a secretary to the Florentine ambassador to Rome, this novel brings to life the period of the Renaissance, including the political intrigue that characterized Rome at the time. Other works include Until the Sun Falls (1969), a story of the ancient Mongols and their empire, The Firedrake (1966), her first published novel, Great Maria (1974), The Bear Flag (1990), and Pacific Street (1991). Holland is very adept at capturing the period she writes about, including the clothing, furnishings, and customs of the time. One critic has noted that Holland "is never guilty of the fatuity which plagues most historical fiction: she never nudges the reader into agreeing that folks way back then were really just like you and me, only they bathed less often.

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