Raising Kids with Sensory Processing Disorders: A Week-by-week Guide to Solving Everyday Sensory Issues

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Prufrock Press, Incorporated, 2013 - Family & Relationships - 168 pages

Proven, week-by-week strategies to improve the performance of children with special sensory needs

Whether it's having to remove tags from clothing or using special dimmed lighting when they study, kids with sensory disorders or special sensory needs often need adaptations in their everyday lives to find success in school and beyond. Taking a look at the most common sensory issues kids face, Raising Kids with Sensory Processing Disorders offers a compilation of unique, proven strategies parents can implement to help their children move beyond their sensory needs and increase their performance on tasks like homework, field trips, transitions between activities, bedtime, holidays, and interactions with friends. Written by a parent of two children with very different sensory needs, the book shows parents how to characterize their child's sensory issues into one of several profiles that they can use to find the best adaptations and changes to their everyday routines.

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About the author (2013)

Rondalyn Whitney, Ph.D., OTR/L, is an assistant professor and Interim Director of the Doctoral Program and research mentor at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. Dr. Whitney writes prolifically on the barriers to optimal quality of life for families when living with a disability, sensory processing, and social participation and is the author of the seminal book, Nonverbal Learning Disorder: Understanding and Coping With NLD and Asperger's-What Parents and Teachers Need to Know. Her new book, Writer's Toolkit, sold out in the first week after release. She is a dynamic and respected national and international presenter, speaking on ASD and related topics and is a content expert on sensory processing, narrative as a therapeutic modality, social skills programs, autism and related disorders, and using technology to reduce barriers of access to quality care and quality of life for families raising a child with a disability. Varleisha D. Gibbs, OTD, OTR/L, began her career after receiving her baccalaureate degree in psychology from the University of Delaware. She continued her studies in the field of occupational therapy, receiving her professional degrees from Columbia University and Thomas Jefferson University. At Columbia University, she received a master's of science degree. Her clinical doctorate in occupational therapy was received at Thomas Jefferson University. In addition, several years of her study occurred within the Ph.D. program of Health Sciences at Seton Hall University. As a full-time faculty member at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Dr. Gibbs is an expert in the field of pediatric therapeutic intervention

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