Mazzatti Gardiol

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Twayne Publishers, 1974 - 177 pages
 

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Page 164 - En El hombre perdido plantea Ramón Gómez de la Serna la novela de la nebulosa y del azar"; Correo Literario; IV, núm.
Page 37 - Desde el punto de vista formal, la mayoría de las obras teatrales de Ramón son dramas, más o menos breves, en un acto. Rita Mazzatti encuentra una sencilla explicación: «Ramón did not have the patience for a gradual building up of plot, he preferred to write short plays and even pantomimes, concentrating on the dramatic moment of truth, revelation or decisión that intrigued him. Consequently most of his dramatizations are imaginative one-act pieces.
Page 116 - As a subject, Poe fits all Ramon's ideals: he lived a bohemian life, combining dedication to the literary ideal with a veritable martyrdom of poverty and hardship; he had wonderfully fantastic powers of invention and a dramatic life story. Ramon had published an earlier version of his Poe in 1920, but more than thirty years later, after he, too, had lived in the New World, Ramon felt that he understood Poe better and revised his biography.
Page 151 - Reichenbach are quoted by permission of the University of Pittsburgh; all rights reserved.
Page 116 - ... dedication to the literary ideal with a veritable martyrdom of poverty and hardship; he had wonderfully fantastic powers of invention and a dramatic life story. Ramon had published an earlier version of his Poe in 1920, but more than thirty years later, after he, too, had lived in the New World, Ramon felt that he understood Poe better and revised his biography. The revised edition revealed the extraordinary poetic level of expression Ramon had by then attained.
Page 146 - Ramon Gomez de la Serna, Los muertos, las muertas, y otras fantasmagorias (Madrid: Cruz y raya, 1935). p. 17. 36. Auto., p. 609. 37. Pedro Massa, personal interview, Instituto cultural de Espana, Buenos Aires, December 21, 1972. 38. Antonio Valencia, "El otro Ramon de America," Arriba (Madrid, January 15, 1963), pp.
Page 116 - Ramon was his subject's love for expressing the unvarnished truth. Quevedo's biography is characterized by a baroque piling of metaphor upon metaphor and gregueria upon gregueria. In it, Ramon "becomes" Quevedo to such an extent that he even paraphrases him. He considers Quevedo's laugh essential to him, and cleverly plays upon it. In these biographical works...
Page 116 - becomes" Quevedo to such an extent that he even paraphrases him. He considers Quevedo's laugh essential to him, and cleverly plays upon it. In these biographical works, Ramon taught himself to laugh with the laugh of Quevedo and to dream surrealistic dreams with the fantastic imagination of Poe. He made of these two figures (as he had of other subjects from the past) living and contemporary personalities. The contemporaneity which Ramon felt with artists who had lived in the past is party explicable...
Page 103 - This study seems to be another example of the sinfronismo mentioned by Ortega in which a subject from another era bridges the chasm of centuries, stimulates a latent feeling or germ of an idea in a contemporary soul, finds a radical affinity there, and through that soul achieves a new and fuller...
Page 116 - America (Edgar Poe, the Genius of America) and Quevedo, both published in 1953. They were written by a man deeply wounded by the coolness that had marred the final part of his return trip to Spain in 1949, and who was still laboring under the financial strain that the trip had caused him.

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