Ramayana

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University of California Press, Nov 1, 2000 - Social Science - 432 pages
6 Reviews
Few works in world literature have inspired so vast an audience, in nations with radically different languages and cultures, as the Ramayana and Mahabharata, two Sanskrit verse epics written some 2,000 years ago.

In Ramayana (written by a poet known to us as Valmiki), William Buck has retold the story of Prince Rama--with all its nobility of spirit, courtly intrigue, heroic renunciation, fierce battles, and triumph of good over evil--in a length and manner that will make the great Indian epics accessible to the contemporary reader.

The same is true for the Mahabharata--in its original Sanskrit, probably the longest Indian epic ever composed. It is the story of a dynastic struggle, between the Kurus and Pandavas, for land. In his introduction, Sanskritist B. A. van Nooten notes, "Apart from William Buck’s rendition [no other English version has] been able to capture the blend of religion and martial spirit that pervades the original epic."

Presented accessibly for the general reader without compromising the spirit and lyricism of the originals, William Buck’s Ramayana and Mahabharata capture the essence of the Indian cultural heritage.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sthitha_pragjna - LibraryThing

William Buck has retold the story of the Ramayana, weaving in storylines from different versions of the epic. In the beginning, the origin of the demons (Rakshasas) and of the interaction between ... Read full review

Review: Ramayana

User Review  - Prashansa - Goodreads

A good epic! Read full review

Contents

V
5
VI
21
VII
50
VIII
62
IX
112
X
124
XI
139
XII
140
XVII
244
XVIII
260
XIX
280
XX
295
XXI
310
XXII
327
XXIII
357
XXIV
358

XIII
164
XIV
178
XV
202
XVI
221
XXV
376
XXVI
391
XXVII
406
Copyright

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Page 1 - Valmiki the Poet looked down into water held cupped in his hand and saw into the past. Before he looked he thought the world was sweet poison. Men seemed to be living in lies, not knowing where their ways went. The days seemed made of ignorance and doubt, and cast from deception and illusion. But in the water he saw — a dream, a chance, and a great adventure.
Page xv - Ramayana — one of the two great epics of India, the other being the Mahabharata.

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About the author (2000)

William Buck died in 1970 at the age of 37 after more than 15 years of work on the Ramayana, Mahabharata, and the unfinished Harivamsa. Of the two finished books, he wrote, "My method in writing both Mahabharata and Ramayana was to begin with a literal translation from which to extract the story, and then to tell that story in an interesting way that would preserve the spirit and flavor of the original.

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