Rameau's Nephew and First Satire

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, UK, Nov 9, 2006 - Fiction - 176 pages
1 Review
In Diderot's brilliant and witty dialogue two acquaintances discuss art, music, education and society. A key work of the French Enlightenment, in this sparkling new translation it is paired with Diderot's First Satire, providing context for Rameau's Nephew, the 'second satire'. - ;'unless you know everything, you really know nothing' Diderot's brilliant and witty dialogue begins with a chance encounter in a Paris caf--eacute--; between two acquaintances. Their talk ranges broadly across art, music, education, and the contemporary scene, as the nephew of composer Rameau, amoral and bohemian, alternately shocks and amuses the moral, bourgeois figure of his interlocutor. Exuberant and highly entertaining, the dialogue exposes the corruption of society in Diderot's characteristic philosophical exploration. The debates of the French Enlightenment speak to us vividly in this sparkling new translation, which also includes the First Satire , a related work that provides the context for Rameau's Nephew, Diderot's 'second satire'. -

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Why would someone like Diderot, who could presumably have published a record of his own bowel movements and had at least a few people read all about it, decide not to publish a fairly amusing, often ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2006)

Denis Diderot was a French philosopher and critic during the Age of Enlightenment. Born in 1713 in Langres, France, Diderot was educated at the University of Paris. From 1745 to 1772 he served as editor of L'Encyclopedie, which he fashioned as a journal of radical revolutionary opinion. He was a leader in the movement to challenge both church and state by furthering knowledge. Diderot also wrote several critical and philosophical works including Pensees sur l'interpretation de la nature (Thoughts on the Interpretation of Nature, 1754). In addition, he published essays based on personal experience, as well as several plays. As a philosopher, Diderot speculated on free will and held a completely materialistic view of the universe; he suggested all human behavior is determined by heredity. He is recognized now as an art critic of the first rank. His Essai sur la peinture (Essay on Painting, 1796) won him posthumous praise as a critic of painting technique and aesthetics. He died in Paris in 1784 and was buried in the city's Église Saint-Roch. His heirs sent his vast library to Catherine II, who had it deposited at the National Library of Russia.

Bibliographic information