Randolph Spencer-Churchill, as a Product of His Age: Being a Personal and Political Monograph

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Hutchinson & Company, 1895 - Great Britain - 408 pages
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Page 285 - ... the interests of the three hundred million beings who are committed to their charge. That is, I say, a state of things unparalleled in history. And how do you think it will all end ? Are we being swept along a turbulent and irresistible torrent which is bearing us towards some political Niagara, in which every mortal thing we now know will be twisted and smashed beyond all recognition ? Or are we, on the other hand, gliding passively along a quiet river of human progress that will lead us to...
Page 286 - ... of the three hundred millions whom they have in their power? And to what extent will the five million electors be exempt from the ordinary human influences of passion and caprice ? This is a problem totally new. It is a problem upon which history throws no light whatever, and moreover it is a problem which comes at a time when the persons who are chiefly responsible for the government of our country are precluded by the very circumstances of their life from giving it the deep attention which...
Page 212 - Whenever by an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances an Opposition is compelled to support the Government, the support should 1 883 be given with a kick and not with a caress and should ^7.34 be withdrawn on the first available moment.
Page 167 - The entire organization of the Tory party must undergo a radical revolution before it can afford ground for any well-founded satisfaction. In its existing shape it is managed by a committee in London whose names are unknown to the people at large, and who act without any mandate from the constituencies. The complaint of the individual Associations prior to 1874 that they were not patronized by the privileged class can no longer be made. They are corrupted by patronage and few escape its baneful influence....
Page 326 - ... rule lie hidden all the memories of fallen dynasties, all the traditions of vanquished races, all the pride of insulted creeds, and it is our task, our most difficult business, to give peace, individual security and general prosperity to the 250 millions of people...
Page 72 - I have tried all forms of excitement from tip-cat to tiger-shooting; all degrees of gambling from beggar-my-neighbour to Monte Carlo; but have found no gambling like politics and no excitement like a big division.
Page 50 - You are quite wrong to say that in my mind " you are only a vague memory." Among several letters I have received, yours has given me the greatest pleasure. It has always been pleasant to me to think that the historical studies which I too lightly carried on under your guidance have been of increasing value to me in calculating and carrying out actions which to many appear erratic...
Page 282 - Lord Beaconsfield ? I do not believe that any of these great statesmen whom I have named, in the whole course of their career, attended half a dozen of those public meetings of the nature which some of us have to attend every week or every month. Cabinet Councils were very few, the House of Commons rarely sat late, and the sessions were comparatively short ; so that these great men had ample time to devote their abilities to deep consideration of the affairs of their country.
Page 257 - ... same platform with Lord Salisbury at a great conservative meeting at Manchester (9 Aug.) In the recess agitation he took an active part, strongly supporting the action of the House of Lords in adopting Lord Cairns's amendment to the franchise bill. He declared his confidence that the nation ' would award the palm, and the honour, and the victory to those who, conscious of the immeasurable responsibilities attaching to an hereditary house, have dauntlessly defended, against an arbitrary minister,...
Page 160 - ... aristocracy, landowners, and adherents whose chief merit is subserviency. The party chiefs live in an atmosphere in which a sense of their own importance and of the importance of their class interests and privileges is exaggerated, and to which the opinions of the common people can scarcely penetrate. They are surrounded by sycophants who continually offer up the incense of personal flattery under the pretext of conveying political information. They half fear and half despise the common people,...

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