Random Harvest: A Novel

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Open Road Media, May 1, 2012 - Fiction - 330 pages
7 Reviews
A World War I veteran’s comfortable life is upended by buried memories in this “completely real and convincing” novel by an Academy Award–winning screenwriter (The New York Times).

Charles Rainier’s family feared him lost along with so many of Britain’s youth during the Great War. But two years after he was reported missing in action, he appears in a Liverpool hospital with no memory of the time that has passed. Rainier marries and embarks on a life of relative success, but he still can’t recall his time on the battlefield—until the first bombs of the Second World War begin to fall.
 
Suddenly, his memories flood back. Now, recollections of a violent battlefield, a German prison, and a passionate affair all threaten to fracture the peaceful life he has worked so hard to create.
 
From the bestselling author of Lost Horizon and Goodbye, Mr. Chips—who also earned an Oscar for his screenwriting during Hollywood’s Golden Age—Random Harvest is a moving account of the trauma of war, the disruption of a seemingly ordinary life, and the courage required to find redemption in the face of the most overwhelming circumstances.
 
 

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User Review  - Olivermagnus - LibraryThing

Random Harvest opens in 1937 with the first narrator, a Cambridge graduate student named Harrison, encountering an older man named Charles Rainier on a train. They discuss the impending war and a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BonnieJune54 - LibraryThing

An interesting book about learning who you are. The main character is literally learning this because he has amnesia but he is also questioning if he has to be the person his background and experiences have turned him into. Read full review

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About the author (2012)

James Hilton (1900–1954) was a bestselling English novelist and Academy Award–winning screenwriter. After attending Cambridge University, Hilton worked as a journalist until the success of his novels Lost Horizon (1933) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1934) launched his career as a celebrated author. Hilton’s writing is known for its depiction of English life between the two world wars, its celebration of English character, and its honest portrayal of life in the early twentieth century.

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