Ranson's Folly

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Jun 1, 2004 - Fiction - 368 pages
0 Reviews
1905. With illustrations by Frederic Remington, Walter Appleton Clark, Howard Chandler Christy, E.M. Ashe and F. Dorr Steele. American journalist and novelist who covered wars all over the world. His vivid accounts made him one of the leading reporters of his day. Ranson's Folly begins: The junior officers of Fort Crockett had organized a mess at the post-trader's. And a mess it certainly is, said Lieutenant Ranson. The dining-table stood between hogsheads of molasses and a blazing log-fire, the counter of the store was their buffet, a pool-table with a cloth, blotted like a map of the Great Lakes, their sideboard, and Indian Pete acted as butler. But none of these things counted against the great fact that each evening Mary Cahill, the daughter of the post-trader, presided over the evening meal, and turned it into a banquet. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2004)

Author and journalist Richard Harding Davis was born in Philadelphia on April 18, 1864. After studying at Lehigh and Johns Hopkins universities, he became a reporter and in 1890, he was the managing editor of Harper's Weekly. On assignments, he toured many areas of the world and recorded his impressions of the American West, Europe, and South America in a series of books. As a foreign correspondent, he covered every war from the Greco-Turkish to World War I and published several books recording his experiences. In 1896, he became part of William Randolph Hearst's unproven plot to start the Spanish-American War in order to boost newspaper sales when Hearst sent him and illustrator Frederick Remington to cover the Cuban rebellion against Spanish rule. In Cuba, Davis wrote several articles that sparked U.S. interest in the struggles of the Cuban people, but he resigned when Hearst changed the facts in one of his stories. Davis was aboard the New York during the bombing of Mantanzas, which gave the New York Herald a scoop on the war. As a result, the U.S. Navy prohibited reporters from being aboard any U.S. ships for the rest of the Cuban conflict. Davis was captured by the German Army in 1914 and was threatened with execution as a spy. He eventually convinced them he was a reporter and was released. He is considered one of the most influential reporters of the yellow journalist era. He died in Mount Kisco, New York on April 11, 1916.

Frederic Sackrider Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U. S. Cavalry. Remington attended the art school at Yale University. He left Yale in 1879 to take care of his ailing father who had tuberculosis. Remington did not return to Yale, instead when his father died he made a trip out to Montana. This trip colored the type of illustrations, sculpture, and novels he would create for the rest of his life. Remington died after an emergency appendectomy led to peritonitis on December 26, 1909. His extreme obesity (weighing in at nearly 300 pounds) had complicated the anesthesia and the surgery. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Canton, New York.

Bibliographic information