Rashi's Daughters, Book I: Joheved: A Novel of Love and the Talmud in Medieval France

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Penguin, Jul 31, 2007 - Fiction - 384 pages
10 Reviews
The first novel in a dramatic trilogy set in eleventh-century France about the lives and loves of three daughters of the great Talmud scholar

In 1068, the scholar Salomon ben Isaac returns home to Troyes, France, to take over the family winemaking business and embark on a path that will indelibly influence the Jewish world, writing the first Talmud commentary, and secretly teaching Talmud to his daughters.

Joheved, the eldest of his three girls, finds her mind and spirit awakened by religious study, but, knowing the risk, she must keep her passion for learning and prayer hidden. When she becomes betrothed to Meir ben Samuel, she is forced to choose between marital happiness and being true to her love of the Talmud.

Rich in period detail and drama, Joheved is a must read for fans of Tracy Chevalier?s Girl With a Pearl Earring.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JanaRose1 - LibraryThing

Joheved, the daughter of a Jewish scholar finds herself caught between her parents when she desires to learn Talmud. While her father is ecstatic to teach her, his mother believes that a learned woman ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JanicsEblen - LibraryThing

This is such a good book! Well written, compelling story. I learned a good deal about life for the Jewish population in France at the time of the story. I heartily recommend this book Read full review

Contents

fifteen
sixteen
seventeen
eighteen
nineteen
twenty
twentyone
twentytwo

five
six
seven
eight
nine
ten
eleven
twelve
thirteen
fourteen
twentythree
twentyfour
twentyfive
twentysix
twentyseven
twentyeight
afterword
glossary
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About the author (2007)

Maggie Anton was born Margaret Antonofsky in Los Angeles, California. Raised in a secular, socialist household, she reached adulthood with little knowledge of her Jewish religion. All that changed when David Parkhurst, who was to become her husband, entered her life, and they both discovered Judaism as adults. In the early 1990's, Anton began studying Talmud in a class for women taught by Rachel Adler, now a professor at Hebrew Union College in Los Angeles. She became intrigued with the idea that Rashi, one of the greatest Jewish scholars ever, had no sons, only three daughters. Slowly but surely, she began to research the family and the time in which they lived. Legend has it that Rashi's daughters were learned in a time when women were traditionally forbidden to study the sacred texts. These forgotten women seemed ripe for rediscovery, and the idea of a book about them was born.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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