Rational Pesticide Use

Front Cover
K. J. Brent, Keith Joseph Brent, R. K. Atkin
Cambridge University Press, Sep 17, 1987 - Nature - 348 pages
There is growing concern among scientists, farmers and the general public that pesticides are being applied ever more widely but with less and less discretion. This book brings together a range of experts to discuss how crop protection chemicals can be used more rationally, so as to maximise benefits in yield and quality while minimising environmental and economic costs. The book is based on the ninth Long Ashton Symposium and is organised into four sections. The first, environment, examines to what extent current pesticide use is affecting the environment and human welfare, and what changes in practice are justified. The second, application, assesses progress in performance and safety in the use of pesticides, while the next section, resistance, looks at problems and shortcomings arising from the appearance of resistant strains of pests, and considers strategies for surmounting these difficulties. The final section, forecast and pest management, asks whether existing methods of assessing risks are acceptable and seeks ways of rending decision making in crop protection more rational.
 

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Contents

Effects of pesticides on wildlife and priorities in future
17
Integrating chemical control with the activity
27
Environmental toxicology its role in crop protection
33
benefit or bureaucracy?
43
The needs of application research in different countries
73
Basic phenomena active in electrostatic pesticide spraying
81
The efficient aerial application of sprays
107
Fungicide resistance in crops its practical significance
137
Decision theory and the economics of crop protection
211
Rationality in pesticide use and the role of forecasting
225
Advances in disease forecasting
239
Potential opportunities for rational pest control
253
advantages and limitations
269
Practice and progress in pest forecasting
285
Progress towards rational weed control strategies
301
a viewpoint from
315

Buildup and persistence of fungicide resistance
153
Resistance and hormoligosis as driving forces behind pest
169
strategies and cooperation in
197
Commercial implementation of forecast methods
333
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