Rattlin, the Reefer

Front Cover
Fireship Press, 2008 - Fiction - 388 pages
0 Reviews
If you like the novels of Frederick Marryat you'll love Edward Howard's Rattlin, the Reefer. Rattlin, the Reefer was edited by Frederick Marryat for his friend and fellow captain Edward Howard. For several generations, however, people thought it was actually written by Marryat because it was that good. Like many of Marryat's books, this book is thought to be autobiographical; although this was never specifically confirmed by Captain Howard himself. However, from the main character's early schooling, to his life as a midshipman, to his experiences aboard ship, there is nothing in this book that could not have happened to a young man in the early 1800's. As such it gives us a wonderful insight into that period. Ralph Rattlin tells his life story with a kind of off-hand humor that is truly engaging. The story's accuracy to nautical detail is total-it could hardly be otherwise with someone like Frederick Marryat as the editor-and the scenes are crisp and vivid. While almost unknown to modern audiences, Edward Howard's writing has been favorably compared to that of Tobias Smollett and Herman Melville. If you enjoy those writers-and especially if you love the works of Frederick Marryat-you'll love Edward Howard's Rattlin, the Reefer
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Frederick Marryat was born on July 10, 1792 in London, England. He entered the Royal Navy at the age of 14 and served with distinction in many parts of the world before retiring in 1830 with the rank of captain. From 1832 to 1835, he edited the Metropolitan Magazine. His first novel, The Naval Officer, was published in 1829. His other adult novels include Mr. Midshipman Easy, The Kings Own, Newton Forster, Peter Simple, Jacob Faithful, and The Phantom Ship. He also wrote a number of children's books including Masterman Ready, Settlers in Canada, The Mission, The Children of the New Forest, and The Little Savages. He travelled in Canada and the United States from 1837 to 1839. Afterward, he recorded his impressions in A Diary in America. He died on August 9, 1848.

Bibliographic information