Rattlin, the Reefer, Volume 1

Front Cover
R. Bentley, 1836 - Children's stories
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 60 - ... shed, enabled me to pass over the trial. It might have been, that, at that period, I could have borne no more, and should have sunk under my accumulated persecutions. I will not say that so it was, for there is an elasticity in early youth that recovers itself against much— yet I was at that time heavy indeed with exceeding hopelessness. All I can say to the sneerer is, I wish, that at the next conclave of personages who may be assembled to discuss the destinies of nations, there may be as...
Page 77 - Hymn. AWAKE, my soul, and with the sun Thy daily course of duty run ; Shake off dull sloth, and early rise To pay thy morning sacrifice. 2...
Page 127 - The wielder of the ruler gave a tremendous wriggle with the whole body, which proved as ineffectual as it was violent. " But don't you think, Ralph," said his tormentor, " as the evening is drawing in, that something should be done for the poor gentleman ; he will most certainly take cold if he remain here all night; couldn't you and your schoolfellows contrive to build a sort of hut over him? I am sure I should be very happy to help to carry the boughs — if the man won't go to the house the house...
Page 136 - ... a fool and a tyrant, fools indeed must those officers be who draw the inference that I mean the impression to be general that all captains are either fools or tyrants. Let the cavillers understand that the tyranny and the folly are innate in the man, but that the service abhors and represses the one, and despises and often reforms the other. The service never made a good man bad or a bad one worse : on the contrary it has always improved the one and reformed the other.
Page 45 - Children of the age above mentioned soon assimilate their tone and conversation with those around them. I was tall for my years, with a very light and active frame, and a countenance the complexion of which was of the most unstained fairness. My hair light, glossy, and naturally but not universally curling. To make it appear in ringlets all over my head would have been the effect of art; yet without art it was wavy, and at the temples, forehead, and the back of the head always in full circlets.
Page 84 - ... supposititious visitor was expected to be found, and lo ! the room was empty. Mrs. Root and the servants were summoned, and they all positively declared, and were willing to swear to the fact, that a gentleman had gone into the room, who had never gone out It was a front parlour, on the ground floor, and from the window he could not have emerged, as the area intervened between that and the foot pavement ; and to see a gentleman scrambling through by that orifice into the principal street of ,...
Page 116 - ... and fainted. When we came into the room she was still in a state of insensibility, and, as we stood around, she slowly opened her eyes; but the moment that they became conscious of my presence, she leaped up with frantic joy, and strained me in her arms, and then, laying her head upon my shoulder, burst into a passion of tears. Mr. R. cast upon me a most triumphant smile : and, as he led me away from the agitated lady, she took a silent farewell of me, with a look of intense fondness, and a depth...
Page 120 - And then she smiled and looked grave, and sighed and laughed ; and I, like a little fool, set all these symptoms of perturbation down to my own unfledged attractions, whilst during their perusal she would often exclaim, " So like him ! — so like him !" I do not know whether I ought to mention it, for it is a censorious world ; but, as I cannot enter into, or be supposed to understand, the feelings of a fine woman of thirty-five caressing a lad of fifteen, I have a right to suppose all such demonstrations...
Page 186 - ... the cabin ; there will be sufficient time for you to say all your smart things on the occasion ; but if after that I hear any more on the subject, by heavens, that man who shall dare to twit me with it, shall go with me to the nearest shore if in harbour — or shoot me, or I him, across the table at sea. Now, gentlemen, begin if you please.
Page 161 - In making this short passage, Captain Reud was very affable and communicative. He could talk of nothing but the beautiful coast of Leghorn, the superb Bay of Naples ; pleasant trips to Rome, visits to Tripoli, and other interesting spots on the African coast; and, on the voluptuous city of Palermo, with its amiable ladies and incessant festivities, he was quite as eloquent as could reasonably be expected from a smart post-captain of four-and-twenty. We were all in a fool's paradise. For myself, I...

Bibliographic information