Ravenna in Late Antiquity: AD; 7. Ravenna capital: 600-850 AD

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 29, 2010 - Architecture - 444 pages
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Ravenna was one of the most important cities of late antique Europe. Between 400 and 751 AD, it was the residence of western Roman emperors, Ostrogothic kings, and Byzantine governors of Italy, while its bishops and archbishops ranked second only to the popes. During this 350-year period, the city was progressively enlarged and enriched by remarkable works of art and architecture, many of which still survive today. Thus, Ravenna and its monuments are of critical importance to historians and art historians of the late ancient world. This book provides a comprehensive survey of Ravenna's history and monuments in late antiquity, including discussions of scholarly controversies, archaeological discoveries, and new interpretations of art works. A synthesis of the voluminous literature on this topic, this volume provides an English-language entry point for the study of this fascinating city.
 

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Ravenna was one of the most important cities of late antique Europe. Between 400 and 751 AD, it was the residence of western Roman emperors, Ostrogothic kings, and Byzantine governors of Italy, while ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
History of Scholarship on Ravenna
5
Some Archaeological Considerations
13
Ravenna and the Historiography of Late Antique Art and Architecture
15
ROMAN RAVENNA
21
The Republican City
24
The Roman Imperial Harbor and Fleet
26
The City of Ravenna in the Roman Empire
31
Sant Apollinare Nuovo
146
Mosaics
152
Santo Spirito the Arian Cathedral
174
The Arian Baptistery
177
The Orthodox Church in Ostrogothic Ravenna
187
The Capella Arcivescovile
188
The Early SixthCentury Churches of Classe
196
The Orthodox Church after Theoderic
198

A Third and FourthCentury Crisis?
35
Ravennas Christian Origins
38
RAVENNA AND THE WESTERN EMPERORS AD 400489
41
Moving the Capital to Ravenna
46
Ravenna as a Capital
48
Ravenna as a sedes imperii
49
The City Walls of Ravenna
52
The Watercourses
54
The Palaces
55
Other Public Buildings
58
Churches
60
Churches in the Honorian Period
61
Galla Placidias Churches
62
San Giovanni Evangelista
63
Santa Croce
70
the mausoleum of galla placidia
74
The Rise of the Church of Ravenna
84
The Cathedral
85
The Orthodox Baptistery
88
The Episcopal Palace
100
other episcopal church foundations
101
The End of Imperial Ravenna
104
RAVENNA THE CAPITAL OF THE OSTROGOTHIC KINGDOM
106
Theoderic and Italy
108
Theoderics Ravenna
114
Theoderics Palaces
119
Theoderics Other Secular Constructions
122
The Mausoleum of Theoderic
124
The Ostrogothic Kingdom after Theoderic to 540
136
RELIGION IN OSTROGOTHIC RAVENNA
139
RAVENNAS EARLY BYZANTINE PERIOD AD 540600
201
The Environment and Italian Urbanism
203
The Byzantine Reconquest and the Lombards
204
The Establishment of a Byzantine Administration
206
The Archbishops of Ravenna
209
The Cathedral and the Episcopal Throne
213
Church Building
219
Church Building in the City of Ravenna
221
Santa Maria Maggiore
222
San Vitale
223
San Michele in Africisco
250
St Stephen
255
Other Churches
256
Church Building in Classe
257
St Probus St Eleuchadius and St Euphemia ad mare
258
SantApollinare in Classe
259
San Severo
274
RAVENNA CAPITAL AD 600850
277
Ravenna Capital of the Byzantine Exarchate
278
The Autocephaly Question
283
After the Exarchate
284
Ravennas Byzantine and PostByzantine Elite
286
The Environment and Urban Life
288
Ravenna Agnellus and the Carolingians
295
Appendix Tables
301
Notes
309
References
397
Index
435
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About the author (2010)

Deborah Mauskopf Deliyannis is Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University. She is the editor and translator of Agnellus of Ravenna's Liber pontificalis ecclesiae Ravennatis and is the Executive Editor of The Medieval Review.

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