Ravensbruck: Life and Death in Hitler's Concentration Camp for Women

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Mar 31, 2015 - History - 768 pages
A masterly and moving account of the most horrific hidden atrocity of World War II: Ravensbrück, the only Nazi concentration camp built for women
 
On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 867 women—housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes—was marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded in through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards.
     Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Holocaust. By the end of the war 130,000 women from more than twenty different European countries had been imprisoned there; among the prominent names were Geneviève de Gaulle, General de Gaulle’s niece, and Gemma La Guardia Gluck, sister of the wartime mayor of New York. 
     Only a small number of these women were Jewish; Ravensbrück was largely a place for the Nazis to eliminate other inferior beings—social outcasts, Gypsies, political enemies, foreign resisters, the sick, the disabled, and the “mad.” Over six years the prisoners endured beatings, torture, slave labor, starvation, and random execution. In the final months of the war, Ravensbrück became an extermination camp. Estimates of the final death toll by April 1945 have ranged from 30,000 to 90,000.
     For decades the story of Ravensbrück was hidden behind the Iron Curtain, and today it is still little known. Using testimony unearthed since the end of the Cold War and interviews with survivors who have never talked before, Sarah Helm has ventured into the heart of the camp, demonstrating for the reader in riveting detail how easily and quickly the unthinkable horror evolved. 
     Far more than a catalog of atrocities, however, Ravensbrück is also a compelling account of what one survivor called “the heroism, superhuman tenacity, and exceptional willpower to survive.” For every prisoner whose strength failed, another found the will to resist through acts of self-sacrifice and friendship, as well as sabotage, protest, and escape. 
     While the core of this book is told from inside the camp, the story also sheds new light on the evolution of the wider genocide, the impotence of the world to respond, and Himmler’s final attempt to seek a separate peace with the Allies using the women of Ravensbrück as a bargaining chip. Chilling, inspiring, and deeply unsettling, Ravensbrück is a groundbreaking work of historical investigation. With rare clarity, it reminds us of the capacity of humankind both for bestial cruelty and for courage against all odds.
 

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User Review  - marshapetry - LibraryThing

Don't pick as your first ww2 book, difficult to read. Definitely with the read however. This and KL (can't remember author's name) were pretty gritty but definite recommends Read full review

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User Review  - knightlight777 - LibraryThing

I was at first a bit reluctant to read this book as I got the feel from the first pages it would be one of these interview account types, not to mention the depressing subject matter. But I am glad I ... Read full review

Contents

Cover
Langefeld
Sandgrube
Blockovas
Himmler Visits
Stalins Gift
Else Krug
Doctor Sonntag
Falling
Hanging
Reaching
Part Five
Paris and Warsaw
Kinderzimmer
Protest
Overtures

Doctor Mennecke
Bernburg
Lublin
Auschwitz
Sewing
Rabbits
Special Experiments
Healing
Part Three
Red Army
Yevgenia Klemm
Doctor Treite
Breaking the Circle
Black Transport
Part Four
Vingtsept Mille
Doctor Loulou
Photo Insert Part
Hungarians
A Childrens Party
Death March
Youth Camp
Hiding
Königsberg
Bernadotte
Emilie
Nelly
Masur 40 White Buses
Liberation
Epilogue
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Sarah Helm is the author of A Life in Secrets: Vera Atkins and the Missing Agents of WWII and the play Loyalty, about the 2003 Iraq War. She was a staff journalist on the Sunday Times (London) and a foreign correspondent on the Independent, and now writes for several publications. She lives in London with her husband and two daughters.

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