Reaching Your Development Goals

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Center for Creative Leadership, 1998 - Business & Economics - 27 pages
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You have just completed a formal feedback experience—perhaps a management development program, performance review, or 360-degree instrument—and through your feedback from superiors, peers, and subordinates you have learned that you have some behaviors that need changing or skills that need development. You’ve set goals for improvement and your impulse is to start working on them as soon as you can. This guidebook describes three strategies to use as you continue to develop your capacity to lead: seeking challenging assignments at work and away from the job, training for specific skills, and building relationships with people who can support your efforts.
 

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About the author (1998)

This series of guidebooks draws on the practical knowledge that the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) has generated, since its inception in 1970, through its research and educational activity conducted in partnership with hundreds of thousands of managers and executives. Much of this knowledge is shared-in a way that is distinct from the typical university department, professional association, or consultancy. CCL is not simply a collection of individual experts, although the individual credentials of its staff are impressive; rather it is a community, with its members holding certain principles in common and working together to understand and generate practical responses to today's leadership and organizational challenges.
The purpose of the series is to provide managers with specific advice on how to complete a developmental task or solve a leadership challenge. In doing that, the series carries out CCL's mission to advance the understanding, practice, and development of leadership for the benefit of society worldwide.

Cynthia D. McCauley is vice president of New Initiatives at CCL. Her work has focused on leadership development through 360-degree feedback, job assignments, and developmental relationships. She has coauthored two of CCL’s management feedback instruments, BenchmarksŪ and the Job Challenge Profile. McCauley has published widely, including coediting The Center for Creative Leadership Handbook of Leadership Development (Jossey-Bass, 1998) and coauthoring Should 360-degree Feedback Be Used Only for Developmental Purposes? (CCL, 1997). She holds a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from the University of Georgia.

Jennifer W. Martineau is a research scientist and manager of the Evaluation Services function at CCL. Her research focuses on the impact of leadership development interventions on individuals, groups or teams, and organizations. Martineau managed the development of REFLECTIONS, CCL’s first postprogram, 360-degree feedback instrument, and has published widely, including a chapter in Maximizing the Value of 360-Degree Feedback (Jossey-Bass, 1998). She holds a Ph.D. in industrial/ organizational psychology from the Pennsylvania State University.

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