Reading Pope's Imitations of Horace

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Bucknell University Press, 1989 - Political Science - 168 pages
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This study reclaims Pope's meaning in each successive imitation by focusing on the differences between Horace's Latin poems and Pope's English versions. It considers not only Pope's expression of concerns about his own world but also the contemporary reputation of the Roman Augustan Age and of Augustus and Horace.
 

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Contents

Reading the Imitation
15
Augustus
28
Horace
42
Reading Horace
53
Beginning The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace Imitated
63
Extremes Ofellus and the Rake
77
Sober Advice from Horace
85
Refuge in a Toppling World
93
Confronting the Age
112
Toward Silence
124
The First Epistle of the First Book of Horace Imitated
128
Epilogue to the Satires Farewell to Horace
143
Notes
146
Select Bibliography
159
Index
165
Copyright

The Second Epistle of the Second Book of Horace Imitated
97

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Page 15 - Horace seem to have been written as relaxations of his genius. This employment became his favourite by its facility ; the plan was ready to his hand, and nothing was required but to accommodate as he could the sentiments of an old author to recent facts or familiar images; but what is easy is seldom excellent; such imitations cannot give pleasure to common readers. The man of learning may be sometimes surprised and delighted by an unexpected parallel ; but the comparison requires knowledge of the...

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