Reading Rock Art: Interpreting the Indian Rock Paintings of the Canadian Shield

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Dundurn, Feb 25, 2002 - Art - 192 pages

More than 400 rock paintings adorn the Canadian Shield from Quebec, across Ontario and as far west as Saskatchewan. The pictographs are the legacy of the Algonkian-speaking Cree and Ojibway, whose roots may extend to the beginnings of human occupancy in the region almost 10,000 years ago.

Archaeologist Grace Rajnovich spent fourteen years of field research uncovering a multitude of clues as to the meanings of the paintings. She has written a text which is unique in its ability to "see" the paintings from a traditional native viewpoint. Skilfully weaving the imagery, metaphors and traditions of the Cree and Ojibway, the author has recaptured the poetry and wisdom of an ancient culture.

Chief Willie Wilson of the Rainy River Band considers Grace’s work "innovative and original."

 

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Contents

Foreword
1 Visions in the Quest for Medicine
2 Dating Rock Art
3 Secular and Sacred Picture Writing
4 Interpreting the Rock Paintings using Algonkian Picture Writing
5 A Stone is filled with Spirit Power
My Painting Makes Me a Manitou
Footnotes
List of Figures
Alphabetical List of Rock Art Sites Mentioned in the Text
Bibliography and Suggested Reading
About the Author
About the Illustrators
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Archaeologist Grace Rajnovich spent fourteen years of field research uncovering a multitude of clues as to the meanings of the paintings.

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