Reading World Literature: Theory, History, Practice

Front Cover
Sarah Lawall
University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 380 pages

As teachers and readers expand the canon of world literature to include writers whose voices traditionally have been silenced by the dominant culture, fundamental questions arise. What do we mean by "world"? What constitutes "literature"? Who should decide?

Reading World Literature is a cumulative study of the concept and evolving practices of "world literature." Sarah Lawall opens the book with a substantial introduction to the overall topic. Twelve original essays by distinguished specialists run the gamut from close readings of specific texts to problems of translation theory and reader response. The sequence of essays develops from re-examinations of traditional canonical pieces through explorations of less familiar works to discussions of reading itself as a "literacy" dependent on worldview.

Reading World Literature will open challenging new vistas for a wide audience in the humanities, from traditionalists to avant-garde specialists in literary theory, cultural studies, and area studies.

 

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Contents

Reading World Literature
1
Classical Criticism and the Canon or Why Read
87
Cesaires Tempest JoanDayan
136
Celtic Literature and the European Canon
160
Latin America Doris Sommer
177
The Example
203
Introduction Sarah Lawall
238
The World
267
Introduction Sarah Lawall
284
Symbolic Experience
309
Being Lucid about
328
Contributors
351
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Sarah Lawall is a professor of comparative literature at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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