Reading and Writing the Mediterranean

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2006 - Literary Collections - 310 pages

Vincenzo Consolo is counted by many critics among the most significant voices in contemporary world literature. This volume makes available for the first in English an edited and annotated volume of Consolo's short stories, essays, and other writings pertaining to the diverse cultures and histories of Sicily and the Mediterranean basin.

The Mediterranean region holds a particular fascination for Consolo, who seeks through his writing to recover the memory of a Sicilian and Mediterranean history, which he feels is presently being threatened by the forces of late-capitalist Western culture. His writings about the region also voice a commitment to questions of ethics and human rights, which have been brought to the fore by recent tensions dividing this area and forcing a mass exodus of its people. At a time when this part of the world is under threat from unbridled globalization as well as dangerous forms of ethnic and religious fundamentalism, Consolo's words offer an insightful rethinking of regionalism within a global hierarchy of values. They remind us of the necessity of moderation and contingency, and in so doing, attempt to recover a moral and ethical dimension for our collective life.

 

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Contents

V
51
VI
76
VII
81
VIII
93
IX
97
X
104
XI
110
XII
117
XXII
227
XXIII
233
XXIV
237
XXV
241
XXVI
246
XXVII
251
XXVIII
253
XXIX
263

XIII
121
XIV
127
XV
129
XVI
153
XVII
159
XVIII
188
XIX
210
XX
214
XXI
225
XXX
271
XXXI
277
XXXII
285
XXXIII
293
XXXIV
295
XXXV
303
XXXVI
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Copyright

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Page 45 - In the horizon of the infinite. — We have left the land and have embarked. We have burned our bridges behind us - indeed, we have gone farther and destroyed the land behind us. Now, little ship, look out! Beside you is the ocean...
Page 41 - Pensò che ritrovata calma, trovate le parole, il tono, la cadenza, avrebbe raccontato, sciolto il grumo dentro. Avrebbe dato ragione, nome a tutto quel dolore.
Page 42 - Mille choses à la fois. Non pas un paysage, mais d'innombrables paysages. Non pas une mer, mais une succession de mers. Non pas une civilisation, mais des civilisations entassées les unes sur les autres. Voyager en Méditerranée, c'est trouver le monde romain au Liban, la préhistoire en Sardaigne, les villes grecques en Sicile, la présence arabe en Espagne, l'Islam turc en Yougoslavie. C'est plonger au plus profond des siècles, jusqu 'aux constructions mégalithiques de Malte ou jusqu'aux pyramides...
Page 41 - Aborriva il romanzo, questo genere scaduto, corrotto, impraticabile. Se mai ne aveva scritti, erano i suoi in una diversa lingua, dissonante, in una furia verbale ch'era finita in urlo, s'era dissolta nel silenzio.

About the author (2006)

Norma Bouchard is a professor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at the University of Connecticut.

Massimo Lollini is Hatzantonis Distinguished Professor in Italian in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.

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