Reading and writing for civic literacy: the critical citizen's guide to argumentative rhetoric

Front Cover
Paradigm Publishers, May 1, 2009 - Education - 404 pages
0 Reviews
This brief edition of a ground-breaking textbook addresses the need for college students to develop critical reading, writing, and thinking skills for self-defense in the contentious arena of American civic rhetoric. Designed for first-year or more advanced composition and critical thinking courses, it is one-third shorter than the original edition, more affordable for students, and easier for teachers to cover in a semester or quarter. It incorporates up-to-date new readings and analysis of controversies like the growing inequality of wealth in America and the debates in the 2008 presidential campaign, expressed in opposing viewpoints from the political left and right. Exercises help students understand the ideological positions and rhetorical patterns that underlie such opposing views. Widely debated issues of whether objectivity is possible and whether there is a liberal or conservative bias in news and entertainment media, as well as in education itself, are foregrounded as topics for rhetorical analysis. Online Materials Available -Steve Brouwer's essay, "If We Decide to Tax the Rich" with complete footnotes and works cited -Model Student Research Paper: "From Reagonomics to Obamanomics" -Research Resources -Glossary of Rhetorical and Critical Thinking Terms -Works Cited

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

An Appeal to Students
3
Critical Education in Historical Perspective
13
Mario Savio An End to History 17 1Adolph L Reed Jr Majoring in Debt 191 Rich Lowry
25
What Is an Argument? What Is a Good Argument?
32
Analysis Synthesis and Judgments
40
A HistoricalCausal Analysis of The White Problem
49
Definitions and Criteria of Critical Thinking
54
Critical Thinking and Cultural Literacy
56
Implications and Inferences
199
Opposing Views 204 Thomas Sowell Chicken Little
206
Logical and Rhetorical Fallacies
211
Glossary of Logical and Rhetorical Fallacies
212
Causal Analysis
222
North
234
Uses and Misuses of Emotional Appeal
242
Appeals to Fear and Pity
250

Avoiding Oversimplification and Recognizing Complexity
62
James Baldwin My Dungeon Shook 691 Walt Whitman A Noiseless Patient Spider 721
73
Semantics in Rhetoric and Critical Thinking
78
Denotation and Connotation
79
Unconcretized Abstractions
85
Mary Ann Glendon When Words Cheapen Life 891 George Lakoff Framing the Issues 901
94
Writing Argumentative Papers
97
Postwriting
102
Naomi Wolf from The Beauty Myth 1161 Christina Hoff Sommers The Backlash Myth
120
Attaining an Open Mind Overcoming
123
Relativism and Commitment
127
Ethnocentrism
134
Questioning Capitalism
140
Virginia Woolf from A Room of Ones Own 1471 Robert Jensen AntiCapitalism in Five
147
Overgeneralization Stereotyping and Prejudice
153
Reverse Prejudice
160
Stephanie Salter An Unexpected Education at St Anthonys 1621 Donald Barlett and James
166
Authoritarianism and Conformity Rationalization
171
Sam Hedrin and Paddy Chayefsky from Network J 74
177
George Orwell from 1984 1811 Katha Pollitt On the Merits 1821 Jeff Jacoby Greens Dodge
184
Elements of Argumentative Rhetoric
189
Elements of Argumentative Rhetoric
191
Mark Twain The War Prayer 2571 Paul Fussell The Real War 19391945 2591 War
260
Thinking Critically About the Rhetoric of Politics
265
Thinking Critically About Political Rhetoric
267
The American Political Spectrum
274
Predictable Patterns of Political Rhetoric
283
Steve Brouwer If We Decided to Tax the Rich 2901 David Horowitz The Intellectual Class
297
Thinking Critically About Mass Media
303
Are News Media Objective? What Are Their Biases?
308
Conclusion
319
Edward S Herman The Illiberal Media 3201 Bernard Goldberg Networks Need a Reality
329
Deception Detection Varieties of Special Interests
334
Lobbying and Public Relations
337
Bruce J Schulman The Historic Power of Special Interests 344 John Brain When Money Talks
351
Putting It All Together in a Long Paper
359
Sklar versus the Wall Street Journal
368
Summary of Suspicious Statistical Arguments
376
Collecting and Evaluating Opposing Sources Writing
384
Works Cited Section
390
Index
393
Credits
403
Copyright

Other editions - View all

About the author (2009)

Donald Lazere, now at the University of Tennessee, is Professor Emeritus from California Polytechnic State University and is the editor of "American Media and Mass Culture: Left Perspectives" (University of California Press).