Reading, language, and literacy: instruction for the twenty-first century

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Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Sep 1, 1993 - Education - 307 pages
The impetus for this book emerged from a conference that brought together publishers, and reading researchers and educators for the purpose of examining the best available research evidence about what we know -- and what we have yet to learn -- about the teaching of reading and about how children learn to read. The goal of the conference was to contribute to a sound research base upon which to develop classroom practices that will ensure that every American child will become fully literate. Because the field is still so deeply divided over the best ways to translate belief into classroom practice, the editors decided to highlight rather than gloss over these divisions. It is hoped that the papers in this volume will promote thought and discussion that will lead to action in improving reading instruction for children, now and into the new century.

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Contents

Phonics and Beginning Reading Instruction
3
A Consideration of Research
25
Some Guidelines for Instruction
45
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Lehr is and education writer who has also worked as a teacher and editor, and served on the stafff of the Center for the Study of Reading for seven years.

Jean Osborn, MEd, is an educational consultant whose prior administrative, research, and teaching experience includes nearly 20 years on the staff of the Center for the Study of Reading, University of Illinois, during which she served as Associate Director for twelve years. The coeditor of four books on reading research, she is the author of more than 30 articles and book chapters, as well as a set of resource materials on textbook adoptions.
Fran Lehr, MA, an education writer who has also worked as a teacher and editor, served on the staff of the Center for the Study of Reading for seven years. She is coauthor (with Stephen Stahl and Jean Osborn) of a summary of Marilyn J. Adams' "Beginning to Read" and coeditor (with Jean Osborn) of "Reading, Language, and Literacy,"

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