Reading-literature Fourth Reader: Adapted and Graded by Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free

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Row, Peterson, 1913 - Readers - 352 pages
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Page 82 - ring, O say, what may it be?" '"Tis a fog-bell on a rock-bound coast!"— And he steer'd for the open sea. "0 father! I hear the sound of guns, O say, what may it be?" "Some ship in distress, that cannot live In such an angry sea!" "0 father! I see a gleaming light, 0 say, what may it
Page 322 - little piece of ground in the whole country. Everything about it went wrong and would go wrong in spite of him. His fences were always falling to pieces. His cow would either go astray or get among the cabbages. Weeds were sure to grow quicker in his fields than anywhere else. The rain always
Page 322 - falling to pieces. His cow would either go astray or get among the cabbages. Weeds were sure to grow quicker in his fields than anywhere else. The rain always made a point of setting in just as he had some outdoor work to do. So that his estate had dwindled away,
Page 324 - took his gun and strolled away into the woods. Here he seated himself at the foot of a tree, and shared the contents of his wallet with Wolf, his dog. "Poor Wolf," he would say, "never mind, my lad, whilst I live thou shalt never want a friend to stand by thee!
Page 338 - moment, a fresh, comely woman passed through the throng to get a peep at the gray-bearded man. She had a chubby child in her arms, which, frightened at his looks, began to cry. "Hush, Rip," cried she; "hush —the old man won't hurt you." The name of the child, the air of the mother, the tone of her voice, all awakened
Page 347 - leaflets quivering hung. The Tree bore his fruit in the mid-summer glow: Said the girl, "May I gather thy berries now?" "Yes, all thou canst see: Take them; all are for thee," Said the Tree, while he bent down his laden boughs low. —Bjbrnstjerne Bjornson.
Page 278 - I can give you that, but not a bit more." "That's a good boy," said the old gentleman again. Then Gluck warmed a plate and sharpened a knife. "I don't care if I do get beaten for it," thought he. Just as he had cut a large slice out of the mutton there came a
Page 197 - very gayly, Toiled and tugged with Hiawatha Till the labor was completed. Then said Hiawatha to him, "0 my little friend, the squirrel, Bravely have you toiled to help me; Take the thanks of Hiawatha, And the name which now he gives you; For hereafter and forever Boys shall call you Adjidaumo, Tail-in-air the boys shall call you!
Page 317 - No trifling, I can't wait! Beside, Folks who put me in a passion May find me pipe after another fashion." "You threaten us, fellow? Do your worst, Blow your pipe there till you burst!
Page 308 - Confound the King and his gold, too," said Gluck; and he opened the flask and poured all the water into the dog's mouth. The dog sprang up and stood on its hind legs. Its tail disappeared, its ears became long and silky, its nose became

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