Reason and Value

Front Cover
CUP Archive, Feb 17, 1983 - Philosophy - 166 pages
0 Reviews
The relations between reason, motivation and value present problems which, though ancient, remain intractable. If values are objective and rational how can they move us and if they are dependent on our contingent desires how can they be rational? E. J. Bond makes a bold attack on this dilemma. The widespread view among philosophers today is that judgements contain an irreducible element of personal commitment. To this Professor Bond proposes an account of values as objective and value judgements as true or false, employing a distinction between grounding and motivating reasons to establish their connection with action. He defines and tests his position against a number of recent theories, providing in the process forceful criticism of Williams, Wiggins, Foot, Narveson and Nagel, among others. A distinctive contribution to the subject, it will stimulate interest and worthwhile debate among philosophers, while also serving as an introduction to this vital topic.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction The problem
1
Desire and motivation
9
Motivating reasons and grounding reasons
27
Desire and the good
42
Objective valueI
57
Objective valueII
84
Hedonism
102
Good and evil
123
Meaning value and practical judgments
136
References
162
Index
164
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Matters of Metaphysics
D. H. Mellor
No preview available - 1991
All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information