Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition

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Andrea A. Lunsford
University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 354 pages
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Women's contribution to rhetoric throughout Western history, like so many other aspects of women's experience, has yet to be fully explored.& In pathbreaking discussions ranging from ancient Greece, though the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, to modern times, sixteen closely coordinated essays examine how women have used language to reflect their vision of themselves and their age; how they have used traditional rhetoric and applied it to women's discourse; and how women have contributed to rhetorical theory.& Language specialists, feminists, and all those interested in rhetoric, composition, and communication, will benefit from the fresh and stimulating cross-disciplinary insights they offer.

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Contents

On Reclaiming Rhetorica
3
Rhetoric Gender and Colonial Ideology
9
Diotima Logos and Desire
25
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Andrea A. Lunsford is the Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor of English and Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford University and a member of the faculty of The Bread Loaf Graduate School of English. She has designed and taught undergraduate and graduate courses in writing history and theory, rhetoric, literacy studies, and intellectual property and is the author or co-author of many books and articles, including "The Everyday Writer;" "Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse; Singular Texts/Plural Authors: Perspectives on Collaborative Writing;" "Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the History of Rhetoric", "Everything's an Argument, Exploring Borderlands: Composition and Postcolonial Studies "and "Writing Matters: Rhetoric in Public and Private Lives.

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