Recollections of A.N. Welby Pugin, and His Father, Augustus Pugin: With Notices of Their Works

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E. Stanford, 1861 - 473 pages
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1861 / 473 pages / Outer Annexe YY

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Page 112 - The mechanical part of Gothic architecture is pretty well understood, but it is the principles which influenced ancient compositions, and the soul which appears in all the former works, which is so lamentably deficient ; nor, as I have before stated, can they be regained but by a restoration of the ancient feelings and sentiments. 'Tis they alone that can restore Gothic architecture...
Page 87 - I was much delighted with the restoration of Magdalen College Chapel by Mr. Cottingham, which I can truly say is one of the most beautiful sjxjcimens of modern design that I have ever seen, and executed both in wood and stone in the best manner.
Page 86 - ... architecture — has been here ; need I say more ? I wound myself up to the pitch to bear the sight of the havoc he had committed. Of course here his old trick of throwing the Lady Chapel into the choir by pulling down the altar-screen ; then he has pewed the choir and walled up the arches of the choir, making the aisles nothing but dark passages.
Page 164 - It is very necessary, therefore, that all those who have felt sorrow at this should know at once that he is not a great architect, but one of the smallest possible or conceivable architects : and that by his own account and setting forth of himself. Hear him : " I believe, as regards architecture, few men have been so unfortunate as myself. I have passed my life in thinking of fine things, studying fine things, designing fine things, and realising very poor ones.
Page 225 - I have now seen Rome and what Italian architecture can do," he wrote,1 "and I do not hesitate to say that it is an imperative duty on every Catholic to defend true and Christian architecture with his whole energy. The modern churches here are frightful ; St. Peter's is far more ugly than I expected, and vilely constructed — a mass of imposition...
Page 163 - Oh ! then, what delight ! what joy unspeakable ! when one of the solemn piles is presented to them, in all its pristine life and glory ! — the stoups are filled to the brim ; the rood is raised on high ; the screen glows with sacred imagery and rich device ; the niches are filled ; the altar is replaced, sustained by sculptured shafts, the relics of the saints repose beneath, the body of Our Lord is enshrined on its consecrated stone ; the lamps of the sanctuary burn bright ; the saintly portraitures...
Page 315 - Let us remember to his honour that, if now there seems to be the dawn of a better architecture, if our edifices seem to be more correct in taste, more genuine in material, more honest in construction, and more sure to last, it was he who first showed us that our architecture offended not only against the laws of beauty, but also against the laws of morality.
Page 226 - Christian antiquities, it would be unbearable — the Sistine Chapel is a melancholy room, the Last Judgment is a painfully muscular delineation of a glorious subject, the Scala Regia a humbug, the Vatican a hideous mass, and St. Peter's is the greatest failure of all. It is quite painful to walk about ; Italian architecture is a mere system of veneering marble slabs...
Page 333 - The two great rules for design are these: 1st, that there should be no features about a building which are not necessary for convenience, construction, or propriety; 2nd, that all ornament should consist of enrichment of the essential construction of the building.
Page 285 - The picturesque effect of the ancient buildings results from the ingenious methods by which the old builders overcame local and constructive difficulties.

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